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Article: The effect of visual stimuli on pain threshold and tolerance

TitleThe effect of visual stimuli on pain threshold and tolerance
Authors
Issue Date2002
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0962-1067
Citation
Journal of Clinical Nursing, 2002, v. 11 n. 4, p. 462-469 How to Cite?
AbstractFor many hospital patients, the experience brings pain and anxiety. Unfamiliar surroundings, various diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, and the sight and sounds of medical procedures exacerbate pain and anxiety. To block off the anxiety-inducing sights and sounds of hospital surroundings and create a pleasing environment, the therapeutic potential of visual stimulation as a nursing intervention was investigated. In a randomized, controlled, cross-over study, pain was produced by a modified tourniquet technique in 46 healthy volunteers. Subjects were randomly allocated to two groups (Group V and Group B) with subsequent cross-over. Those in Group V watched a soundless video display of natural scenery during tourniquet inflation, whereas in Group B subjects watched a static blank screen. Pain threshold was defined as the time when subjects reported the first detectable pain, whereas pain tolerance was the time the pain was reported to be intolerable and deflation of the tourniquet was requested. With the use of visual stimuli, there was a significant increase in pain threshold (P < 0.05) and pain tolerance (P < 0.01). Gender and the sequence of visual stimuli did not have any significant effect on pain threshold and pain tolerance. Further studies specifically addressing level of anxiety and physiological data correlated with pain scores and visual stimuli are needed. The findings have implications for nurses and other healthcare professionals to use various visual stimuli as positive adjuncts to other methods of pain relief and for different pain conditions in clinical areas. © 2002 Blackwell Science Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/67275
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.384
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.755
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTse, MMYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNg, JKFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChung, JWYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, TKSen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T05:53:32Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T05:53:32Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Clinical Nursing, 2002, v. 11 n. 4, p. 462-469en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0962-1067en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/67275-
dc.description.abstractFor many hospital patients, the experience brings pain and anxiety. Unfamiliar surroundings, various diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, and the sight and sounds of medical procedures exacerbate pain and anxiety. To block off the anxiety-inducing sights and sounds of hospital surroundings and create a pleasing environment, the therapeutic potential of visual stimulation as a nursing intervention was investigated. In a randomized, controlled, cross-over study, pain was produced by a modified tourniquet technique in 46 healthy volunteers. Subjects were randomly allocated to two groups (Group V and Group B) with subsequent cross-over. Those in Group V watched a soundless video display of natural scenery during tourniquet inflation, whereas in Group B subjects watched a static blank screen. Pain threshold was defined as the time when subjects reported the first detectable pain, whereas pain tolerance was the time the pain was reported to be intolerable and deflation of the tourniquet was requested. With the use of visual stimuli, there was a significant increase in pain threshold (P < 0.05) and pain tolerance (P < 0.01). Gender and the sequence of visual stimuli did not have any significant effect on pain threshold and pain tolerance. Further studies specifically addressing level of anxiety and physiological data correlated with pain scores and visual stimuli are needed. The findings have implications for nurses and other healthcare professionals to use various visual stimuli as positive adjuncts to other methods of pain relief and for different pain conditions in clinical areas. © 2002 Blackwell Science Ltd.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0962-1067en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Nursingen_HK
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www3.interscience.wiley.comen_HK
dc.subject.meshAnxiety - psychology-
dc.subject.meshPain - prevention and control - psychology-
dc.subject.meshPain Measurement-
dc.subject.meshPain Threshold-
dc.subject.meshPhotic Stimulation-
dc.titleThe effect of visual stimuli on pain threshold and toleranceen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailNg, JKF: jkfng@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityNg, JKF=rp00544en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1046/j.1365-2702.2002.00608.x-
dc.identifier.pmid12100642-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036636866-
dc.identifier.hkuros67170en_HK
dc.identifier.volume11-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage462-
dc.identifier.epage469-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000176526700007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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