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Article: Bonding of contemporary glass ionomer cements to dentin

TitleBonding of contemporary glass ionomer cements to dentin
Authors
KeywordsGlass ionomer cement
Microtensile bond strength
Surface interaction zone
Ultrastructure
Issue Date2001
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/dental
Citation
Dental Materials, 2001, v. 17 n. 5, p. 456-470 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: The objective of this study was to investigate the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of contemporary glass ionomer cements (GIC) to sound coronal dentin. Methods: Three specimen teeth were prepared for each material tested: Fuji IX GP (GC), ChemFlex (Dentsply) and Ketac-Molar Aplicap (ESPE). GIC buildups were made according to the manufacturers' instructions. After being stored at 37°C, 100% humidity for 24 h, the teeth were vertically sectioned into 1 × 1 mm beams for μTBS evaluation. Representative fractured beams were prepared for scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) examination. Results: Results of the μTBS test were: Fuji IX GP (12.4 ± 8.6 MPa), ChemFlex (15.0 ± 9.3 MPa) and Ketac-Molar Aplicap (11.4 ± 7.7 MPa). One-way ANOVA and a multiple comparison test showed that ChemFlex had a statistically higher μTBS (p < 0.05). SEM fractographic analysis showed that the predominant failure modes were interfacial and mixed failures. The GIC side of the fractured beams revealed dehydration cracks, a high level of porosity, and voids with an eggshell-like crust. TEM analysis of the demineralized dentin sides of the fractured beams revealed the presence of an intermediate layer along the GIC-dentin interface. This zone was present on the fractured dentin surface in the case of interfacial failure, and beneath GIC remnants in specimens that exhibited a mixed failure mode. Significance: The findings suggest that the bonding of GIC to dentin is not weak and that the μTBS values probably represent the weak yield strengths of GICs under tension. © 2001 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/67241
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.931
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.339
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYip, HKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTay, FRen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNgo, HCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSmales, RJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPashley, DHen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T05:53:10Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T05:53:10Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_HK
dc.identifier.citationDental Materials, 2001, v. 17 n. 5, p. 456-470en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0109-5641en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/67241-
dc.description.abstractObjective: The objective of this study was to investigate the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of contemporary glass ionomer cements (GIC) to sound coronal dentin. Methods: Three specimen teeth were prepared for each material tested: Fuji IX GP (GC), ChemFlex (Dentsply) and Ketac-Molar Aplicap (ESPE). GIC buildups were made according to the manufacturers' instructions. After being stored at 37°C, 100% humidity for 24 h, the teeth were vertically sectioned into 1 × 1 mm beams for μTBS evaluation. Representative fractured beams were prepared for scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) examination. Results: Results of the μTBS test were: Fuji IX GP (12.4 ± 8.6 MPa), ChemFlex (15.0 ± 9.3 MPa) and Ketac-Molar Aplicap (11.4 ± 7.7 MPa). One-way ANOVA and a multiple comparison test showed that ChemFlex had a statistically higher μTBS (p < 0.05). SEM fractographic analysis showed that the predominant failure modes were interfacial and mixed failures. The GIC side of the fractured beams revealed dehydration cracks, a high level of porosity, and voids with an eggshell-like crust. TEM analysis of the demineralized dentin sides of the fractured beams revealed the presence of an intermediate layer along the GIC-dentin interface. This zone was present on the fractured dentin surface in the case of interfacial failure, and beneath GIC remnants in specimens that exhibited a mixed failure mode. Significance: The findings suggest that the bonding of GIC to dentin is not weak and that the μTBS values probably represent the weak yield strengths of GICs under tension. © 2001 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/dentalen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofDental Materialsen_HK
dc.rightsDental Materials. Copyright © Elsevier Inc.en_HK
dc.subjectGlass ionomer cementen_HK
dc.subjectMicrotensile bond strengthen_HK
dc.subjectSurface interaction zoneen_HK
dc.subjectUltrastructureen_HK
dc.titleBonding of contemporary glass ionomer cements to dentinen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0109-5641&volume=17&spage=456&epage=470&date=2001&atitle=Bonding+of+contemporary+glass+ionomer+cements+to+dentinen_HK
dc.identifier.emailYip, HK: kevin.h.k.yip@hkusua.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYip, HK=rp00027en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0109-5641(01)00007-0en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid11445213en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0035458269en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros60090en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0035458269&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume17en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage456en_HK
dc.identifier.epage470en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000170407300011-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYip, HK=25423244900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTay, FR=7102091962en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNgo, HC=7005488528en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSmales, RJ=7005372382en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPashley, DH=35448600800en_HK

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