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Article: Investigative methods for studying the adhesion and cell surface hydrophobicity of candida species: An overview

TitleInvestigative methods for studying the adhesion and cell surface hydrophobicity of candida species: An overview
Authors
KeywordsAdhesion
Candida
Issue Date2001
PublisherInforma Healthcare. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/0891060x.asp
Citation
Microbial Ecology In Health And Disease, 2001, v. 13 n. 1, p. 46-54 How to Cite?
AbstractCandidal infections are common opportunistic infections in the compromized and manifest both as superficial and systemic diseases. The superficial infections are by far the commonest form of the disease. Although Candida albicans is the most common Candida species isolated from humans and is responsible for the majority of superficial yeast infections, non-albicans species such as Candida krusei, Candida glabrata, Candida parapsilosis and Candida tropicalis are regularly isolated but to a lesser extent. The adhesion of microorganisms to biological and inert surfaces is a vital prerequisite for successful microbial colonization and infection, and its critical role in the pathogenesis of many fungal infections is widely recognized. Such attachment enables the organisms to avoid dislodgment due to the cleaning action of bathing mucosal secretions, and facilitate infection. Consequently the process of candidal adhesion to biological and inert surfaces has been investigated extensively. These studies include adhesion to biological surfaces such as exfoliated epithelial cells, cultured epithelial cells, endothelial cells, animal tissues and fibrin clots and inert surfaces such as denture prostheses. Cell surface hydrophobicity, a contributory factor facilitating or impeding candidal adhesion has also been investigated by many using a number of techniques, although the biphasic hydrocarbon-aqueous phase assay appears to be the most popular and commonly used. Clearly, an ideal assay for investigating Candida adhesion or cell surface hydrophobicity has yet to be established. However, some assays are better than others with respect to the ease of methodology, reproducibility, and cost effectiveness. In this overview we critically evaluate the investigative methods that are used to assess the adhesion and cell surface hydrophobicity of Candida species.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/67220
ISSN
1998 Impact Factor: 0.605
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.281
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorEllepola, ANBen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSamaranayake, LPen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T05:52:59Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T05:52:59Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_HK
dc.identifier.citationMicrobial Ecology In Health And Disease, 2001, v. 13 n. 1, p. 46-54en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0891-060Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/67220-
dc.description.abstractCandidal infections are common opportunistic infections in the compromized and manifest both as superficial and systemic diseases. The superficial infections are by far the commonest form of the disease. Although Candida albicans is the most common Candida species isolated from humans and is responsible for the majority of superficial yeast infections, non-albicans species such as Candida krusei, Candida glabrata, Candida parapsilosis and Candida tropicalis are regularly isolated but to a lesser extent. The adhesion of microorganisms to biological and inert surfaces is a vital prerequisite for successful microbial colonization and infection, and its critical role in the pathogenesis of many fungal infections is widely recognized. Such attachment enables the organisms to avoid dislodgment due to the cleaning action of bathing mucosal secretions, and facilitate infection. Consequently the process of candidal adhesion to biological and inert surfaces has been investigated extensively. These studies include adhesion to biological surfaces such as exfoliated epithelial cells, cultured epithelial cells, endothelial cells, animal tissues and fibrin clots and inert surfaces such as denture prostheses. Cell surface hydrophobicity, a contributory factor facilitating or impeding candidal adhesion has also been investigated by many using a number of techniques, although the biphasic hydrocarbon-aqueous phase assay appears to be the most popular and commonly used. Clearly, an ideal assay for investigating Candida adhesion or cell surface hydrophobicity has yet to be established. However, some assays are better than others with respect to the ease of methodology, reproducibility, and cost effectiveness. In this overview we critically evaluate the investigative methods that are used to assess the adhesion and cell surface hydrophobicity of Candida species.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherInforma Healthcare. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/0891060x.aspen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofMicrobial Ecology in Health and Diseaseen_HK
dc.rightsMicrobial Ecology in Health & Disease. Copyright © Informa Healthcare.en_HK
dc.subjectAdhesionen_HK
dc.subjectCandidaen_HK
dc.titleInvestigative methods for studying the adhesion and cell surface hydrophobicity of candida species: An overviewen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0891-060X&volume=13&spage=46&epage=54&date=2001&atitle=Investigative+Methods+for+Studying+the+Adhesion+and+Cell+Surface+Hydrophobicity+of+Candida+Species:+An+Overviewen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSamaranayake, LP:lakshman@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySamaranayake, LP=rp00023en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/089106001750071708en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0035082516en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros56952en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0035082516&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume13en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage46en_HK
dc.identifier.epage54en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEllepola, ANB=6604060863en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSamaranayake, LP=7102761002en_HK

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