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Article: Escherichia coli and its lipopolysaccharide modulate in vitro Candida biofilm formation

TitleEscherichia coli and its lipopolysaccharide modulate in vitro Candida biofilm formation
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherSociety for General Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://jmm.sgmjournals.org
Citation
Journal Of Medical Microbiology, 2009, v. 58 n. 12, p. 1623-1631 How to Cite?
AbstractDemystification of microbial behaviour in mixed biofilms could have a major impact on our understanding of infectious diseases. The objectives of this study were to evaluate in vitro the interactions of six different Candida species and a Gram-negative coliform, Escherichia coli, in dual-species biofilms, and to assess the effect of E. coli LPS on Candida biofilm formation. A single isolate of E. coli ATCC 25922 and six different species of Candida, Candida albicans ATCC 90028, Candida glabrata ATCC 90030, Candida krusei ATCC 6258, Candida tropicalis ATCC 13803, Candida parapsilosis ATCC 22019 and Candida dubliniensis MYA-646, were studied using a standard biofilm assay. Each Candida species was co-cultured with E. coli on a polystyrene surface and biofilm formation was quantified by a c.f.u. assay. The biofilm was then analysed by Live/Dead staining and fluorescence microscopy (confocal laser-scanning microscopy, CLSM), whilst scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was employed to visualize the biofilm architecture. The effect of E. coli LPS on Candida biofilm cell activity at defined time intervals was assessed with an XTT reduction assay. A significant quantitative reduction in c.f.u. counts of C. tropicalis (after 90 min), C. parapsilosis (after 90 min and 24 h), C. krusei (after 24 h) and C. dubliniensis (after 24 and 48 h) was noted on incubation with E. coli in comparison with their monospecies biofilm counterparts (P<0.05). On the other hand, a simultaneous and significant reduction in E. coli cell numbers occurred on co-culture with C. albicans (after 90 min), and an elevation of E. coli cell numbers followed co-culture with C. tropicalis (after 24 h) and C. dubliniensis (after 24 h and 48 h) (P<0.05). All quantitative findings were confirmed by SEM and CLSM analyses. By SEM observation, dual-species biofilms demonstrated scanty architecture with reduced visible cell counts at all stages of biofilm development, despite profuse growth and dense colonization in their single-species counterparts. Significantly elevated metabolic activity, as assessed by XTT readings, was observed in E. coli LPS-treated C. tropicalis and C. parapsilosis biofilms (after 48 h), whilst this had the opposite effect for C. dubliniensis (after 24 h) (P<0.05). These data indicate that E. coli and Candida species in a mixed-species environment mutually modulate biofilm development, both quantitatively and qualitatively, and that E. coli LPS appears to be a key component in mediating these outcomes. © 2009 SGM.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/67219
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.269
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.060
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
The University of Hong KongCERG HKU 7624/06M
Funding Information:

The authors would like to acknowledge Dr Zaw Moe Thein for his advice. This study was supported by grant CERG HKU 7624/06M from The University of Hong Kong.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBandara, HMHNen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYau, JYYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWatt, RMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJin, LJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSamaranayake, LPen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T05:52:59Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T05:52:59Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Medical Microbiology, 2009, v. 58 n. 12, p. 1623-1631en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0022-2615en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/67219-
dc.description.abstractDemystification of microbial behaviour in mixed biofilms could have a major impact on our understanding of infectious diseases. The objectives of this study were to evaluate in vitro the interactions of six different Candida species and a Gram-negative coliform, Escherichia coli, in dual-species biofilms, and to assess the effect of E. coli LPS on Candida biofilm formation. A single isolate of E. coli ATCC 25922 and six different species of Candida, Candida albicans ATCC 90028, Candida glabrata ATCC 90030, Candida krusei ATCC 6258, Candida tropicalis ATCC 13803, Candida parapsilosis ATCC 22019 and Candida dubliniensis MYA-646, were studied using a standard biofilm assay. Each Candida species was co-cultured with E. coli on a polystyrene surface and biofilm formation was quantified by a c.f.u. assay. The biofilm was then analysed by Live/Dead staining and fluorescence microscopy (confocal laser-scanning microscopy, CLSM), whilst scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was employed to visualize the biofilm architecture. The effect of E. coli LPS on Candida biofilm cell activity at defined time intervals was assessed with an XTT reduction assay. A significant quantitative reduction in c.f.u. counts of C. tropicalis (after 90 min), C. parapsilosis (after 90 min and 24 h), C. krusei (after 24 h) and C. dubliniensis (after 24 and 48 h) was noted on incubation with E. coli in comparison with their monospecies biofilm counterparts (P<0.05). On the other hand, a simultaneous and significant reduction in E. coli cell numbers occurred on co-culture with C. albicans (after 90 min), and an elevation of E. coli cell numbers followed co-culture with C. tropicalis (after 24 h) and C. dubliniensis (after 24 h and 48 h) (P<0.05). All quantitative findings were confirmed by SEM and CLSM analyses. By SEM observation, dual-species biofilms demonstrated scanty architecture with reduced visible cell counts at all stages of biofilm development, despite profuse growth and dense colonization in their single-species counterparts. Significantly elevated metabolic activity, as assessed by XTT readings, was observed in E. coli LPS-treated C. tropicalis and C. parapsilosis biofilms (after 48 h), whilst this had the opposite effect for C. dubliniensis (after 24 h) (P<0.05). These data indicate that E. coli and Candida species in a mixed-species environment mutually modulate biofilm development, both quantitatively and qualitatively, and that E. coli LPS appears to be a key component in mediating these outcomes. © 2009 SGM.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSociety for General Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://jmm.sgmjournals.orgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Medical Microbiologyen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsJournal of Medical Microbiology. Copyright © Society for General Microbiology.-
dc.rightsThis is an author manuscript that has been accepted for publication in [Journal Title], copyright Society for General Microbiology, but has not been copy-edited, formatted or proofed. Cite this article as appearing in [Journal Title]. This version of the manuscript may not be duplicated or reproduced, other than for personal use or within the rule of 'Fair Use of Copyrighted Materials' (section 17, Title 17, US Code), without permission from the copyright owner, Society for General Microbiology. The Society for General Microbiology disclaims any responsibility or liability for errors or omissions in this version of the manuscript or in any version derived from it by any other parties. The final copy-edited, published article, which is the version of record, can be found at [Journal URL], and is freely available without a subscription.-
dc.subject.meshBiofilms - growth and development-
dc.subject.meshCandida - classification - drug effects - physiology-
dc.subject.meshEscherichia coli - physiology-
dc.subject.meshLipopolysaccharides - metabolism - pharmacology-
dc.subject.meshSpecies Specificity-
dc.titleEscherichia coli and its lipopolysaccharide modulate in vitro Candida biofilm formationen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0022-2615&volume=58&issue=12&spage=1623&epage=1631&date=2009&atitle=Escherichia+coli+and+its+lipopolysaccharide+modulate+in+vitro+Candida+biofilm+formationen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWatt, RM:rmwatt@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailJin, LJ:ljjin@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSamaranayake, LP:lakshman@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWatt, RM=rp00043en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityJin, LJ=rp00028en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySamaranayake, LP=rp00023en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1099/jmm.0.012989-0en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19661208en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-73449121449en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros168790en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-73449121449&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume58en_HK
dc.identifier.issue12en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1623en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1631en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1473-5644-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000272258300014-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBandara, HMHN=35721385900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYau, JYY=7102167568en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWatt, RM=7102907536en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJin, LJ=7403328850en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSamaranayake, LP=7102761002en_HK

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