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Article: Incisor winging in Chinese

TitleIncisor winging in Chinese
Authors
KeywordsIncisor Winging
Southern Chinese
Issue Date2010
PublisherBentham Open. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bentham.org/open/toanthj/index.htm
Citation
The Open Anthropology Journal, 2010, v. 3, p. 8-11 How to Cite?
AbstractAim: To investigate the incisor wingings of the Southern Chinese and compare these with studies in different populations. Materials and Methods: The maxillary and mandibular incisor alignment in study casts of an unselected sample from a 12 year old Hong Kong Oral Health Survey of 12 year old children (n=459; 295 boys and 164 girls) were studied. Results: The prevalence of bilateral winging in the maxillary arch was 9% for males and 10% for females respectively. The prevalence of bilateral winging of the mandibular incisors was higher than the maxillary central incisors, at a prevalence of 22% for both sexes. Bilateral counter-winging of the central incisors was rare. Conclusion: The prevalence of bilateral winging or mesio-palatal rotation of upper central incisors was between low and intermediate in the Southern Chinese. On the contrary, the prevalence of counter-winging was low.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/67218
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLing, JYKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, RWKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T05:52:58Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T05:52:58Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe Open Anthropology Journal, 2010, v. 3, p. 8-11en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1874-9127en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/67218-
dc.description.abstractAim: To investigate the incisor wingings of the Southern Chinese and compare these with studies in different populations. Materials and Methods: The maxillary and mandibular incisor alignment in study casts of an unselected sample from a 12 year old Hong Kong Oral Health Survey of 12 year old children (n=459; 295 boys and 164 girls) were studied. Results: The prevalence of bilateral winging in the maxillary arch was 9% for males and 10% for females respectively. The prevalence of bilateral winging of the mandibular incisors was higher than the maxillary central incisors, at a prevalence of 22% for both sexes. Bilateral counter-winging of the central incisors was rare. Conclusion: The prevalence of bilateral winging or mesio-palatal rotation of upper central incisors was between low and intermediate in the Southern Chinese. On the contrary, the prevalence of counter-winging was low.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBentham Open. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bentham.org/open/toanthj/index.htmen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofThe Open Anthropology Journalen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectIncisor Winging-
dc.subjectSouthern Chinese-
dc.titleIncisor winging in Chineseen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1874-9127&volume=3&spage=8&epage=11&date=2010&atitle=Incisor+Winging+in+Chineseen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, RWK: fyoung@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, RWK=rp00038en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.2174/1874912701003010008-
dc.identifier.hkuros168752en_HK
dc.identifier.volume3-
dc.identifier.spage8-
dc.identifier.epage11-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands-

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