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Article: The emotional effects of tooth loss in partially dentate people attending prosthodontic clinics in dental schools in England, Scotland and Hong Kong: A preliminary investigation

TitleThe emotional effects of tooth loss in partially dentate people attending prosthodontic clinics in dental schools in England, Scotland and Hong Kong: A preliminary investigation
Authors
KeywordsEmotional effect
Partially dentate
Tooth loss
Issue Date2001
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1875-595X
Citation
International Dental Journal, 2001, v. 51 n. 6, p. 457-462 How to Cite?
AbstractAim: To compare the emotional effects of tooth loss in three partially dentate populations. Design: A questionnaire survey. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire was completed by 150 partially dentate subjects undergoing routine prosthodontic care at Guy's, King's and St Thomas's Dental Institute, London; the Dental School, Dundee, Scotland; and the Faculty of Dentistry, University of Hong Kong. Data were analysed using the Chi-square test. Results: Forty nine per cent of all participants reported difficulties in accepting the loss of some of their teeth. People from Dundee were less likely to have difficulties accepting tooth loss (P = 0.001). People from London took longer to come to terms with their tooth loss and were more likely to feel less confident (P < 0.001). Fifty five per cent of all participants restricted their choice of foods and 54 per cent had not enjoyed their food as much as before. Fewer people in Dundee restricted their choice of food (P < 0.001) and were more likely to enjoy their food (P = 0.009). People in Hong Kong were most likely to restrict their choice of food (P = 0.006). Thirty five percent of all subjects felt unprepared for the effects that tooth loss had upon them. People in Hong Kong were more prepared for tooth loss than those in Dundee and London (P = 0.003). In addition, they were less concerned about leaving their dentures out overnight (P= 0.024). Conclusions: The emotional effects of tooth loss were significant in all groups. People from London took longer to come to terms with their tooth loss. © 2001 FDI/World Dental Press.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/67176
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.967
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.512
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFiske, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDavis, DMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, KCMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMcMillan, ASen_HK
dc.contributor.authorScott, BJJen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T05:52:36Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T05:52:36Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Dental Journal, 2001, v. 51 n. 6, p. 457-462en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0020-6539en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/67176-
dc.description.abstractAim: To compare the emotional effects of tooth loss in three partially dentate populations. Design: A questionnaire survey. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire was completed by 150 partially dentate subjects undergoing routine prosthodontic care at Guy's, King's and St Thomas's Dental Institute, London; the Dental School, Dundee, Scotland; and the Faculty of Dentistry, University of Hong Kong. Data were analysed using the Chi-square test. Results: Forty nine per cent of all participants reported difficulties in accepting the loss of some of their teeth. People from Dundee were less likely to have difficulties accepting tooth loss (P = 0.001). People from London took longer to come to terms with their tooth loss and were more likely to feel less confident (P < 0.001). Fifty five per cent of all participants restricted their choice of foods and 54 per cent had not enjoyed their food as much as before. Fewer people in Dundee restricted their choice of food (P < 0.001) and were more likely to enjoy their food (P = 0.009). People in Hong Kong were most likely to restrict their choice of food (P = 0.006). Thirty five percent of all subjects felt unprepared for the effects that tooth loss had upon them. People in Hong Kong were more prepared for tooth loss than those in Dundee and London (P = 0.003). In addition, they were less concerned about leaving their dentures out overnight (P= 0.024). Conclusions: The emotional effects of tooth loss were significant in all groups. People from London took longer to come to terms with their tooth loss. © 2001 FDI/World Dental Press.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1875-595Xen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Dental Journalen_HK
dc.subjectEmotional effecten_HK
dc.subjectPartially dentateen_HK
dc.subjectTooth lossen_HK
dc.subject.meshAttitude to Health - ethnologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshChi-Square Distributionen_HK
dc.subject.meshDental Clinicsen_HK
dc.subject.meshDenture, Partial - psychologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshEating - psychologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshEmotions - classificationen_HK
dc.subject.meshEnglanden_HK
dc.subject.meshFood Preferencesen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshInterpersonal Relationsen_HK
dc.subject.meshJaw, Edentulous, Partially - ethnology - psychologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshLondonen_HK
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_HK
dc.subject.meshSchools, Dentalen_HK
dc.subject.meshScotlanden_HK
dc.subject.meshSelf Concepten_HK
dc.subject.meshSocial Adjustmenten_HK
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_HK
dc.subject.meshTooth Loss - ethnology - psychologyen_HK
dc.titleThe emotional effects of tooth loss in partially dentate people attending prosthodontic clinics in dental schools in England, Scotland and Hong Kong: A preliminary investigationen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0020-6539&volume=51&spage=457&epage=461&date=2001&atitle=The+emotional+effects+of+tooth+loss+in+partially+dentate+people+attending+prosthodontic+clinics+in+dental+schools+in+England,+Scotland+and+Hong+Kong:+a+preliminary+investigation.en_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, KCM: kcmleung@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailMcMillan, AS: annemcmillan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, KCM=rp00032en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMcMillan, AS=rp00014en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid11789714-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0035751987en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros67925en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0035751987&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume51en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage457en_HK
dc.identifier.epage462en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000177300700008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFiske, J=7006394673en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDavis, DM=7404612355en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, KCM=26221830300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcMillan, AS=7102843317en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridScott, BJJ=7403291438en_HK

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