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Article: Bacterial and yeast flora of root surface caries in elderly, ethnic Chinese
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TitleBacterial and yeast flora of root surface caries in elderly, ethnic Chinese
 
AuthorsShen, S1
Samaranayake, LP1 2
Yip, HK
Dyson, JE
 
KeywordsChinese
Elderly
Epidemiology
Microbiology
Root caries
Yeast
 
Issue Date2002
 
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=1354-523X&site=1
 
CitationOral Diseases, 2002, v. 8 n. 4, p. 207-217 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1034/j.1601-0825.2002.01796.x
 
AbstractOBJECTIVES: Root caries is emerging as a significant problem in the middle aged and elderly. As little data is available on the microbiology of root caries in Chinese cohorts, we evaluated 30 such lesions in elderly, institutionalized, ethnic Chinese. METHODS: Samples of carious dentine were aseptically taken from root caries lesions of 18 subjects (five males and 13 females, mean age 79.67 ± 8.57). The cultivable bacteria, both aerobic and anaerobic, were isolated and identified using standard methods and commercial identification kits. The yeasts were isolated on Sabouraud's agar and identified using the API system. RESULTS: The main findings were: (1) of the total isolates, 91.09% were Gram-positive and 8.91% were Gram-negative microorganisms; (2) the proportions of cocci and rods were 36.68 and 63.31%, respectively; (3) the predominant groups of organisms isolated were Streptococcus spp., Lactobacillus spp., Staphylococcus spp. and Actinomyces spp. with isolation frequencies of 100, 90.00, 73.33 and 63.33%, respectively; (4) the isolation frequency of yeasts belonging to Candida spp. (63.33%) was notably high although the proportion of yeasts within each sample was low (0.01%). Candida dubliniensis, a newly identified yeast species particularly prevalent in HIV infection, comprised 14.29% of yeasts. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides baseline information on the microbiologic features of root caries in the elderly, ethnic Chinese. Whilst our data on the most predominant bacteria isolated in root caries concur with those from other regions of the world the isolation of C. dubliniensis from these lesions has not been documented before.
 
ISSN1354-523X
2012 Impact Factor: 2.377
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.732
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1034/j.1601-0825.2002.01796.x
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000176662500006
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorShen, S
 
dc.contributor.authorSamaranayake, LP
 
dc.contributor.authorYip, HK
 
dc.contributor.authorDyson, JE
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T05:51:55Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T05:51:55Z
 
dc.date.issued2002
 
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: Root caries is emerging as a significant problem in the middle aged and elderly. As little data is available on the microbiology of root caries in Chinese cohorts, we evaluated 30 such lesions in elderly, institutionalized, ethnic Chinese. METHODS: Samples of carious dentine were aseptically taken from root caries lesions of 18 subjects (five males and 13 females, mean age 79.67 ± 8.57). The cultivable bacteria, both aerobic and anaerobic, were isolated and identified using standard methods and commercial identification kits. The yeasts were isolated on Sabouraud's agar and identified using the API system. RESULTS: The main findings were: (1) of the total isolates, 91.09% were Gram-positive and 8.91% were Gram-negative microorganisms; (2) the proportions of cocci and rods were 36.68 and 63.31%, respectively; (3) the predominant groups of organisms isolated were Streptococcus spp., Lactobacillus spp., Staphylococcus spp. and Actinomyces spp. with isolation frequencies of 100, 90.00, 73.33 and 63.33%, respectively; (4) the isolation frequency of yeasts belonging to Candida spp. (63.33%) was notably high although the proportion of yeasts within each sample was low (0.01%). Candida dubliniensis, a newly identified yeast species particularly prevalent in HIV infection, comprised 14.29% of yeasts. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides baseline information on the microbiologic features of root caries in the elderly, ethnic Chinese. Whilst our data on the most predominant bacteria isolated in root caries concur with those from other regions of the world the isolation of C. dubliniensis from these lesions has not been documented before.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationOral Diseases, 2002, v. 8 n. 4, p. 207-217 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1034/j.1601-0825.2002.01796.x
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1034/j.1601-0825.2002.01796.x
 
dc.identifier.epage217
 
dc.identifier.hkuros79949
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000176662500006
 
dc.identifier.issn1354-523X
2012 Impact Factor: 2.377
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.732
 
dc.identifier.issue4
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036021287
 
dc.identifier.spage207
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/67095
 
dc.identifier.volume8
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=1354-523X&site=1
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofOral Diseases
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectChinese
 
dc.subjectElderly
 
dc.subjectEpidemiology
 
dc.subjectMicrobiology
 
dc.subjectRoot caries
 
dc.subjectYeast
 
dc.titleBacterial and yeast flora of root surface caries in elderly, ethnic Chinese
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Samaranayake, LP</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Yip, HK</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Dyson, JE</contributor.author>
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<description.abstract>OBJECTIVES: Root caries is emerging as a significant problem in the middle aged and elderly. As little data is available on the microbiology of root caries in Chinese cohorts, we evaluated 30 such lesions in elderly, institutionalized, ethnic Chinese. METHODS: Samples of carious dentine were aseptically taken from root caries lesions of 18 subjects (five males and 13 females, mean age 79.67 &#177; 8.57). The cultivable bacteria, both aerobic and anaerobic, were isolated and identified using standard methods and commercial identification kits. The yeasts were isolated on Sabouraud&apos;s agar and identified using the API system. RESULTS: The main findings were: (1) of the total isolates, 91.09% were Gram-positive and 8.91% were Gram-negative microorganisms; (2) the proportions of cocci and rods were 36.68 and 63.31%, respectively; (3) the predominant groups of organisms isolated were Streptococcus spp., Lactobacillus spp., Staphylococcus spp. and Actinomyces spp. with isolation frequencies of 100, 90.00, 73.33 and 63.33%, respectively; (4) the isolation frequency of yeasts belonging to Candida spp. (63.33%) was notably high although the proportion of yeasts within each sample was low (0.01%). Candida dubliniensis, a newly identified yeast species particularly prevalent in HIV infection, comprised 14.29% of yeasts. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides baseline information on the microbiologic features of root caries in the elderly, ethnic Chinese. Whilst our data on the most predominant bacteria isolated in root caries concur with those from other regions of the world the isolation of C. dubliniensis from these lesions has not been documented before.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Prince Philip Dental Hospital