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Article: Self-reported occupation-related health problems in Hong Kong dentists

TitleSelf-reported occupation-related health problems in Hong Kong dentists
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherHong Kong Dental Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkda.org/hkdj/index.php
Citation
Hong Kong Dental Journal, 2006, v. 3 n. 1, p. 39-44 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective. To collect information from dentists in Hong Kong concerning common occupation-related health problems, their knowledge about these problems, and the precautions they commonly took to avoid such problems. Methods. Questionnaires were sent by mail to a randomly selected sample of 500 dentists working in both the private and the public sectors in Hong Kong during April 2002. The dentists were asked to complete the questionnaire and return it by mail using the stamped addressed envelope provided. The questionnaire was used to assess their knowledge of occupation-related health problems, their experience of such problems, and the safety precautions they took. Results. A total of 208 completed questionnaires were received (response rate, 42%). It was found that nearly all of the respondent dentists wore gloves (99%) and face masks (97%) during work but only 36% of them wore protective glasses. Most (73%) of them had experienced at least one occupation-related health problem in the 3 months prior to the survey. The most common problem, experienced by 43% of the respondents, was musculoskeletal pain (mostly neck and low back pain). This was followed by allergic dermatitis of the hands (24%) and injuries caused by sharp instruments (17%). Only 18% of the respondents reported that they tried to avoid bending the neck or back when carrying out treatment. Half of the respondents indicated that they needed further training in occupational health and safety. Conclusion. Occupationrelated health problems among Hong Kong dentists were common. There is a substantial need and demand for further training in occupational health and safety among dentists.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/66973
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, TKLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLo, ECMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, HHAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMok, WHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, JLKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T05:50:54Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T05:50:54Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationHong Kong Dental Journal, 2006, v. 3 n. 1, p. 39-44en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1727-2300en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/66973-
dc.description.abstractObjective. To collect information from dentists in Hong Kong concerning common occupation-related health problems, their knowledge about these problems, and the precautions they commonly took to avoid such problems. Methods. Questionnaires were sent by mail to a randomly selected sample of 500 dentists working in both the private and the public sectors in Hong Kong during April 2002. The dentists were asked to complete the questionnaire and return it by mail using the stamped addressed envelope provided. The questionnaire was used to assess their knowledge of occupation-related health problems, their experience of such problems, and the safety precautions they took. Results. A total of 208 completed questionnaires were received (response rate, 42%). It was found that nearly all of the respondent dentists wore gloves (99%) and face masks (97%) during work but only 36% of them wore protective glasses. Most (73%) of them had experienced at least one occupation-related health problem in the 3 months prior to the survey. The most common problem, experienced by 43% of the respondents, was musculoskeletal pain (mostly neck and low back pain). This was followed by allergic dermatitis of the hands (24%) and injuries caused by sharp instruments (17%). Only 18% of the respondents reported that they tried to avoid bending the neck or back when carrying out treatment. Half of the respondents indicated that they needed further training in occupational health and safety. Conclusion. Occupationrelated health problems among Hong Kong dentists were common. There is a substantial need and demand for further training in occupational health and safety among dentists.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherHong Kong Dental Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkda.org/hkdj/index.phpen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong Dental Journalen_HK
dc.titleSelf-reported occupation-related health problems in Hong Kong dentistsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLi, TKL: thomasli@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLo, ECM: hrdplcm@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, JLK: lkleung@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLo, ECM=rp00015en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, JLK=rp00010en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros116993en_HK
dc.identifier.volume3-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage39-
dc.identifier.epage44-
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong-

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