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Article: An exploratory study on cultural variations in oral health attitudes, behaviour and values of freshman (first-year) dental students

TitleAn exploratory study on cultural variations in oral health attitudes, behaviour and values of freshman (first-year) dental students
Authors
KeywordsCluster analysis
Cross-national comparison
Dental students
Occidental- and oriental- culture differences
Oral health attitudes/behaviour
Issue Date2005
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1875-595X
Citation
International Dental Journal, 2005, v. 55 n. 4, p. 205-211 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To identify similarities and differences in oral health attitudes, behaviour and values among freshman dental students. Design: Cross-cultural survey of dental students. Setting: 18 cultural areas. Participants and Methods: 904 first-year dental students completed the Hiroshima University-Dental Behavioural Inventory (HU-DBI) translated into their own languages. Individual areas were clustered by similarity in responses to the questions. Results: The first group displayed an Occidental-culture orientation' with the exception of Brazil (Cluster 1 comprised: Australia, United Kingdom, Ireland, Belgium and Brazil, Cluster 2: Germany, Italy, Finland and France). The second group displayed an 'oriental-cultural orientation' with the exception of Greece and Israel (Cluster 3 comprised: China and Indonesia, and Cluster 4: Japan, Korea, Israel, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Thailand and Greece). Australia and United Kingdom were the countries that were most alike. Ireland was the 'neighbour' to these countries. Greece and Malaysia had similar patterns of oral health behaviour although geographic conditions are very different. Although it was considered that in Hong Kong, occidental nations have affected the development of education, it remained in the oriental-culture group. Comparison with the data from the occidentals indicates that a higher percentage of the orientals put off going to the dentist until they have toothache (p<0.001). Only a small proportion of the occidentals (8%) reported a perception of inevitability in having false teeth, whereas 33% of the orientals held this fatalistic belief (p=0.001). Conclusions: Grouping the countries into key cultural orientations and international clusters yielded plausible results, using the HU-DBI. © 2005 FDI/World Dental Press.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/66903
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.967
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.512
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKawamura, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorWright, FACen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDeclerck, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorFreire, MCMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHu, DYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHonkala, Een_HK
dc.contributor.authorLévy, Gen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKalwitzki, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorPolychronopoulou, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYip, HKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKinirons, MJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorEli, Ien_HK
dc.contributor.authorPetti, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKomabayashi, Ten_HK
dc.contributor.authorKim, KJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorRazak, AAAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSrisilapanan, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKwan, SYLen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T05:50:19Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T05:50:19Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Dental Journal, 2005, v. 55 n. 4, p. 205-211en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0020-6539en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/66903-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To identify similarities and differences in oral health attitudes, behaviour and values among freshman dental students. Design: Cross-cultural survey of dental students. Setting: 18 cultural areas. Participants and Methods: 904 first-year dental students completed the Hiroshima University-Dental Behavioural Inventory (HU-DBI) translated into their own languages. Individual areas were clustered by similarity in responses to the questions. Results: The first group displayed an Occidental-culture orientation' with the exception of Brazil (Cluster 1 comprised: Australia, United Kingdom, Ireland, Belgium and Brazil, Cluster 2: Germany, Italy, Finland and France). The second group displayed an 'oriental-cultural orientation' with the exception of Greece and Israel (Cluster 3 comprised: China and Indonesia, and Cluster 4: Japan, Korea, Israel, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Thailand and Greece). Australia and United Kingdom were the countries that were most alike. Ireland was the 'neighbour' to these countries. Greece and Malaysia had similar patterns of oral health behaviour although geographic conditions are very different. Although it was considered that in Hong Kong, occidental nations have affected the development of education, it remained in the oriental-culture group. Comparison with the data from the occidentals indicates that a higher percentage of the orientals put off going to the dentist until they have toothache (p<0.001). Only a small proportion of the occidentals (8%) reported a perception of inevitability in having false teeth, whereas 33% of the orientals held this fatalistic belief (p=0.001). Conclusions: Grouping the countries into key cultural orientations and international clusters yielded plausible results, using the HU-DBI. © 2005 FDI/World Dental Press.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1875-595Xen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Dental Journalen_HK
dc.subjectCluster analysisen_HK
dc.subjectCross-national comparisonen_HK
dc.subjectDental studentsen_HK
dc.subjectOccidental- and oriental- culture differencesen_HK
dc.subjectOral health attitudes/behaviouren_HK
dc.titleAn exploratory study on cultural variations in oral health attitudes, behaviour and values of freshman (first-year) dental studentsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0020-6539&volume=55&spage=205&epage=211&date=2005&atitle=An+exploratory+study+on+cultural+variations+in+oral+health+attitudes,+behaviour+and+values+of+freshman+(first-year)+dental+studentsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailYip, HK: kevin.h.k.yip@hkusua.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYip, HK=rp00027en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1875-595X.2005.tb00317.x-
dc.identifier.pmid16167608-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-24644518120en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros105334en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-24644518120&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume55en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage205en_HK
dc.identifier.epage211en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000231721600001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKawamura, M=7403091338en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWright, FAC=7201445753en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDeclerck, D=7006009601en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFreire, MCM=7102299206en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHu, DY=7402585338en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHonkala, E=7005947775en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLévy, G=7402345900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKalwitzki, M=6603215371en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPolychronopoulou, A=6602558232en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYip, HK=25423244900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKinirons, MJ=26643493300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEli, I=7005879726en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPetti, S=7004653426en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKomabayashi, T=7006730082en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKim, KJ=7409319785en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRazak, AAA=36807700000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSrisilapanan, P=6602800384en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKwan, SYL=7102903651en_HK

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