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Article: Exploring the oral bacterial flora: Current status and future directions
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TitleExploring the oral bacterial flora: Current status and future directions
 
AuthorsParahitiyawa, NB3
Scully, C1
Leung, WK3
Yam, WC2
Jin, LJ3
Samaranayake, LP3
 
KeywordsImmunology and microbiology
 
Issue Date2010
 
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=1354-523X&site=1
 
CitationOral Diseases, 2010, v. 16 n. 2, p. 136-145 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1601-0825.2009.01607.x
 
AbstractObjective: The oral cavity forms an indispensable part of the human microbiome, for its unique and diverse microflora distributed within various niches. While majority of these organisms exhibit commensalism, shifts in bacterial community dynamics cause pathological changes within oral cavity and distant sites. The aim of this review was to appraise the current and emerging methods of detecting bacteria of the oral cavity paying particular attention to the cultivation independent methods. Design: Literature pertaining to cultivation based and cultivation independent methods of oral bacterial identification was reviewed. Methods: The specific advantages and disadvantages of cultivation based, microscopic, immunological and metagenomic identification methods were appraised. Results: Because of their fastidious and exacting growth requirements, cultivation based studies grossly underestimate the extent of bacterial diversity in these polymicrobial infections. Culture independent methods deemed more sensitive in identifying difficult to culture and novel bacterial species. Conclusion: Apart from characterizing potentially novel bacterial species, the nucleic acid sequence data analyzed using various bioinformatics protocols have revealed that there are in excess of 700 bacterial species inhabiting the mouth. Moreover, the latest pyrosequencing based methods have further broadened the extent of bacterial diversity in oral niches. © 2009 John Wiley & Sons A/S.
 
ISSN1354-523X
2013 Impact Factor: 2.404
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1601-0825.2009.01607.x
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000274713400003
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong Research Grants CouncilRGC HKU 7624/06M
HKU7518/05M
Strategic Research Theme on Infection and Immunity of The University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

The Authors wish to acknowledge the financial support to this work from the Hong Kong Research Grants Council (Grant RGC HKU 7624/06M to L.P.S. and Grant HKU7518/05M to L.J.J.) and the Strategic Research Theme on Infection and Immunity of The University of Hong Kong.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorParahitiyawa, NB
 
dc.contributor.authorScully, C
 
dc.contributor.authorLeung, WK
 
dc.contributor.authorYam, WC
 
dc.contributor.authorJin, LJ
 
dc.contributor.authorSamaranayake, LP
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T05:49:22Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T05:49:22Z
 
dc.date.issued2010
 
dc.description.abstractObjective: The oral cavity forms an indispensable part of the human microbiome, for its unique and diverse microflora distributed within various niches. While majority of these organisms exhibit commensalism, shifts in bacterial community dynamics cause pathological changes within oral cavity and distant sites. The aim of this review was to appraise the current and emerging methods of detecting bacteria of the oral cavity paying particular attention to the cultivation independent methods. Design: Literature pertaining to cultivation based and cultivation independent methods of oral bacterial identification was reviewed. Methods: The specific advantages and disadvantages of cultivation based, microscopic, immunological and metagenomic identification methods were appraised. Results: Because of their fastidious and exacting growth requirements, cultivation based studies grossly underestimate the extent of bacterial diversity in these polymicrobial infections. Culture independent methods deemed more sensitive in identifying difficult to culture and novel bacterial species. Conclusion: Apart from characterizing potentially novel bacterial species, the nucleic acid sequence data analyzed using various bioinformatics protocols have revealed that there are in excess of 700 bacterial species inhabiting the mouth. Moreover, the latest pyrosequencing based methods have further broadened the extent of bacterial diversity in oral niches. © 2009 John Wiley & Sons A/S.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationOral Diseases, 2010, v. 16 n. 2, p. 136-145 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1601-0825.2009.01607.x
 
dc.identifier.citeulike6841665
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1601-0825.2009.01607.x
 
dc.identifier.epage145
 
dc.identifier.hkuros169117
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000274713400003
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong Research Grants CouncilRGC HKU 7624/06M
HKU7518/05M
Strategic Research Theme on Infection and Immunity of The University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

The Authors wish to acknowledge the financial support to this work from the Hong Kong Research Grants Council (Grant RGC HKU 7624/06M to L.P.S. and Grant HKU7518/05M to L.J.J.) and the Strategic Research Theme on Infection and Immunity of The University of Hong Kong.

 
dc.identifier.issn1354-523X
2013 Impact Factor: 2.404
 
dc.identifier.issue2
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid19627515
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77249086715
 
dc.identifier.spage136
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/66790
 
dc.identifier.volume16
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=1354-523X&site=1
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofOral Diseases
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshBacteria - classification - growth & development
 
dc.subject.meshBacteriological Techniques
 
dc.subject.meshBiodiversity
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshMetagenome
 
dc.subject.meshMetagenomics
 
dc.subject.meshMouth - microbiology
 
dc.subject.meshMouth Diseases - microbiology
 
dc.subject.meshTooth Diseases - microbiology
 
dc.subjectImmunology and microbiology
 
dc.titleExploring the oral bacterial flora: Current status and future directions
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. UCL
  2. The University of Hong Kong Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine
  3. The University of Hong Kong