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Article: Ultrastructural study of a glass ionomer-based, all-in-one adhesive
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TitleUltrastructural study of a glass ionomer-based, all-in-one adhesive
 
AuthorsTay, FR1
Sano, H5
Tagami, J4
Hashimoto, M5
Moulding, KM3
Yiu, C1
Pashley, DH2
 
Issue Date2001
 
PublisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jdent
 
CitationJournal Of Dentistry, 2001, v. 29 n. 7, p. 489 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0300-5712(01)00046-X
 
AbstractObjective: Reactmer Bond (Shofu Inc., Kyoto, Japan) is a glass ionomer (GI) based, tri-curable, all-in-one, filled adhesive. Both fluoroaluminosilicate glass (FASG) and fully pre-reacted glass (F-PRG) are used as fillers. This study examined the ultrastructure and elemental composition of resin-dentine interfaces that were treated with this adhesive. Methods: Dentine disks prepared from human third molars were abraded with either 600- or 60-grit SiC paper to create smear layers of different thickness. They were bonded using Reactmer Bond. Cryo-fractured dentine surfaces devoid of smear layers were also bonded by chemical-activation and GI reaction without additional light-activation, or allowing the GI reaction to proceed for l min before the adhesive was applied and light-activated. Undemineralised and demineralised sections were processed for TEM examination and STEM/EDX analysis. Results: Resin-dentine interface from specimens with smear layers consisted of a mineral-dense surface layer that resided on top of a partially demineralised dentine. The partially demineralised zone was considerably thicker in the 600-grit than the 60-grit specimens. In smear layer-free specimens that were cured by chemical-activation/GI modes only, the surface layer concurred with the partially demineralised zone, and appeared as an electron-dense layer over the undemineralised intact dentine. Smear layer-free specimens that were cured by the light-activation of the partially neutralised adhesive contained incomplete amorphous surface layers only. Apart from colloidal silica, FASG fillers were the predominant filler type within the resin matrices. Peripheral hydrogel layers that contained electron-dense 'seeds' were found around the FASG fillers. F-PRG fillers were only sparsely observed. In specimens that were laboratory demineralised with formic acid, phase separation of the unstained resin matrices into electron-dense and electron-lucent domains occurred. Artefactual dendritic deposits were found within the electron-dense domains. Conclusions: The presence of a surface interaction layer on top of a partially demineralised zone along the resin-dentine interface suggests that either a GI-type reaction or precipitation of insoluble carboxylate salts around remnant apatite crystallites may occur when this single-step adhesive interacts with dentine. Appearance of artefactual dendritic deposits suggests that continuous ion movement is possible within the hydrophilic portion of the resin matrix in this fluoride-releasing adhesive. © 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
ISSN0300-5712
2013 Impact Factor: 2.840
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.159
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0300-5712(01)00046-X
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000172058100005
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorTay, FR
 
dc.contributor.authorSano, H
 
dc.contributor.authorTagami, J
 
dc.contributor.authorHashimoto, M
 
dc.contributor.authorMoulding, KM
 
dc.contributor.authorYiu, C
 
dc.contributor.authorPashley, DH
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T05:48:21Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T05:48:21Z
 
dc.date.issued2001
 
dc.description.abstractObjective: Reactmer Bond (Shofu Inc., Kyoto, Japan) is a glass ionomer (GI) based, tri-curable, all-in-one, filled adhesive. Both fluoroaluminosilicate glass (FASG) and fully pre-reacted glass (F-PRG) are used as fillers. This study examined the ultrastructure and elemental composition of resin-dentine interfaces that were treated with this adhesive. Methods: Dentine disks prepared from human third molars were abraded with either 600- or 60-grit SiC paper to create smear layers of different thickness. They were bonded using Reactmer Bond. Cryo-fractured dentine surfaces devoid of smear layers were also bonded by chemical-activation and GI reaction without additional light-activation, or allowing the GI reaction to proceed for l min before the adhesive was applied and light-activated. Undemineralised and demineralised sections were processed for TEM examination and STEM/EDX analysis. Results: Resin-dentine interface from specimens with smear layers consisted of a mineral-dense surface layer that resided on top of a partially demineralised dentine. The partially demineralised zone was considerably thicker in the 600-grit than the 60-grit specimens. In smear layer-free specimens that were cured by chemical-activation/GI modes only, the surface layer concurred with the partially demineralised zone, and appeared as an electron-dense layer over the undemineralised intact dentine. Smear layer-free specimens that were cured by the light-activation of the partially neutralised adhesive contained incomplete amorphous surface layers only. Apart from colloidal silica, FASG fillers were the predominant filler type within the resin matrices. Peripheral hydrogel layers that contained electron-dense 'seeds' were found around the FASG fillers. F-PRG fillers were only sparsely observed. In specimens that were laboratory demineralised with formic acid, phase separation of the unstained resin matrices into electron-dense and electron-lucent domains occurred. Artefactual dendritic deposits were found within the electron-dense domains. Conclusions: The presence of a surface interaction layer on top of a partially demineralised zone along the resin-dentine interface suggests that either a GI-type reaction or precipitation of insoluble carboxylate salts around remnant apatite crystallites may occur when this single-step adhesive interacts with dentine. Appearance of artefactual dendritic deposits suggests that continuous ion movement is possible within the hydrophilic portion of the resin matrix in this fluoride-releasing adhesive. © 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Dentistry, 2001, v. 29 n. 7, p. 489 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0300-5712(01)00046-X
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0300-5712(01)00046-X
 
dc.identifier.epage489
 
dc.identifier.hkuros72229
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000172058100005
 
dc.identifier.issn0300-5712
2013 Impact Factor: 2.840
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.159
 
dc.identifier.issue7
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid11809327
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0035468333
 
dc.identifier.spage489
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/66673
 
dc.identifier.volume29
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jdent
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Dentistry
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsJournal of Dentistry. Copyright © Elsevier Ltd.
 
dc.subject.meshAluminum Compounds - chemistry
 
dc.subject.meshApatites - chemistry
 
dc.subject.meshArtifacts
 
dc.subject.meshCarbon Compounds, Inorganic
 
dc.subject.meshCarboxylic Acids - chemistry
 
dc.subject.meshChemical Precipitation
 
dc.subject.meshDental Bonding
 
dc.subject.meshDentin - ultrastructure
 
dc.subject.meshDentin-Bonding Agents - chemistry
 
dc.subject.meshElectron Probe Microanalysis
 
dc.subject.meshFluorides - chemistry
 
dc.subject.meshFormic Acids - chemistry
 
dc.subject.meshGlass Ionomer Cements - chemistry
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshHydrogel - chemistry
 
dc.subject.meshLight
 
dc.subject.meshMethacrylates - chemistry
 
dc.subject.meshMicroscopy, Electron
 
dc.subject.meshMicroscopy, Electron, Scanning
 
dc.subject.meshPolyurethanes - chemistry
 
dc.subject.meshSilicon Compounds - chemistry
 
dc.subject.meshSilicon Dioxide - chemistry
 
dc.subject.meshSmear Layer
 
dc.subject.meshSurface Properties
 
dc.subject.meshTricarboxylic Acids - chemistry
 
dc.titleUltrastructural study of a glass ionomer-based, all-in-one adhesive
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Tagami, J</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Hashimoto, M</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Moulding, KM</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Yiu, C</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Pashley, DH</contributor.author>
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<description.abstract>Objective: Reactmer Bond (Shofu Inc., Kyoto, Japan) is a glass ionomer (GI) based, tri-curable, all-in-one, filled adhesive. Both fluoroaluminosilicate glass (FASG) and fully pre-reacted glass (F-PRG) are used as fillers. This study examined the ultrastructure and elemental composition of resin-dentine interfaces that were treated with this adhesive. Methods: Dentine disks prepared from human third molars were abraded with either 600- or 60-grit SiC paper to create smear layers of different thickness. They were bonded using Reactmer Bond. Cryo-fractured dentine surfaces devoid of smear layers were also bonded by chemical-activation and GI reaction without additional light-activation, or allowing the GI reaction to proceed for l min before the adhesive was applied and light-activated. Undemineralised and demineralised sections were processed for TEM examination and STEM/EDX analysis. Results: Resin-dentine interface from specimens with smear layers consisted of a mineral-dense surface layer that resided on top of a partially demineralised dentine. The partially demineralised zone was considerably thicker in the 600-grit than the 60-grit specimens. In smear layer-free specimens that were cured by chemical-activation/GI modes only, the surface layer concurred with the partially demineralised zone, and appeared as an electron-dense layer over the undemineralised intact dentine. Smear layer-free specimens that were cured by the light-activation of the partially neutralised adhesive contained incomplete amorphous surface layers only. Apart from colloidal silica, FASG fillers were the predominant filler type within the resin matrices. Peripheral hydrogel layers that contained electron-dense &apos;seeds&apos; were found around the FASG fillers. F-PRG fillers were only sparsely observed. In specimens that were laboratory demineralised with formic acid, phase separation of the unstained resin matrices into electron-dense and electron-lucent domains occurred. Artefactual dendritic deposits were found within the electron-dense domains. Conclusions: The presence of a surface interaction layer on top of a partially demineralised zone along the resin-dentine interface suggests that either a GI-type reaction or precipitation of insoluble carboxylate salts around remnant apatite crystallites may occur when this single-step adhesive interacts with dentine. Appearance of artefactual dendritic deposits suggests that continuous ion movement is possible within the hydrophilic portion of the resin matrix in this fluoride-releasing adhesive. &#169; 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Medical College of Georgia
  3. Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
  4. Tokyo Medical and Dental University
  5. Hokkaido University