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Article: A prospective study of the impact of nasopharyngeal cancer and radiotherapy on the psychosocial condition of Chinese patients
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TitleA prospective study of the impact of nasopharyngeal cancer and radiotherapy on the psychosocial condition of Chinese patients
 
AuthorsLee, PWH1 2
Kwan, TTC1
Kwong, DLW1
Sham, JST1
Pow, EHN1
McMillan, AS1
Au, GKH1
 
KeywordsCourse
Nasopharyngeal cancer
Psychological response
Psychosocial impact
Radiotherapy
 
Issue Date2007
 
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/28741
 
CitationCancer, 2007, v. 109 n. 7, p. 1344-1354 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cncr.22539
 
AbstractBACKGROUND. Radiotherapy (RT) promises optimistic results in the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). The objective of the current study was to map out prospectively the impact of NPC and RT on patients from diagnosis to 1 year posttreatment. METHODS. For this study, 67 Chinese patients (46 men and 21 women) with newly diagnosed stage I or II NPC who received primary RT were recruited. Physical and psychosocial adjustments were measured by using the Rotterdam Symptom Checklist, Beck Anxiety Inventory, Beck Depression Inventory, Perceived Stress Scale, and the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). Semistructured clinical interviews were conducted at bimonthly intervals from pre-RT to 1 year post-RT. RESULTS. Physical and psychosocial adjustments were poorest from pre-RT to the end of RT. Rapid improvements in all areas were noted in the first 2 months post-RT and reached a plateau at around the 6th month. At 1 year, except for physical symptoms and perceived stress, patient measures recovered to their pre-RT levels. At 1 year, patients had more physical complaints (P < .001) but less perceived stress (P = .002). The percentage of patients who expressed fear of dying dropped from 28% pre-RT to 2% at 1 year. However, patients who expressed "fear of the worst happening" increased from 51% pre-RT to 57% at 1 year. CONCLUSIONS. Different periods in treatment of NPC imposed different psychosocial demands on patients. The current results indicated that the period from diagnosis to 2-month post-RT was a high-risk period both physically and emotionally. After treatment, most patients showed resilience despite persistent side effects of RT and successfully resumed their pretreatment level of functioning by the end of the year. Despite resuming a normal or near-normal living, patients still noted a subdued fear of recurrence. © 2007 American Cancer Society.
 
ISSN0008-543X
2013 Impact Factor: 4.901
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cncr.22539
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000245229000015
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLee, PWH
 
dc.contributor.authorKwan, TTC
 
dc.contributor.authorKwong, DLW
 
dc.contributor.authorSham, JST
 
dc.contributor.authorPow, EHN
 
dc.contributor.authorMcMillan, AS
 
dc.contributor.authorAu, GKH
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T05:48:20Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T05:48:20Z
 
dc.date.issued2007
 
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND. Radiotherapy (RT) promises optimistic results in the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). The objective of the current study was to map out prospectively the impact of NPC and RT on patients from diagnosis to 1 year posttreatment. METHODS. For this study, 67 Chinese patients (46 men and 21 women) with newly diagnosed stage I or II NPC who received primary RT were recruited. Physical and psychosocial adjustments were measured by using the Rotterdam Symptom Checklist, Beck Anxiety Inventory, Beck Depression Inventory, Perceived Stress Scale, and the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). Semistructured clinical interviews were conducted at bimonthly intervals from pre-RT to 1 year post-RT. RESULTS. Physical and psychosocial adjustments were poorest from pre-RT to the end of RT. Rapid improvements in all areas were noted in the first 2 months post-RT and reached a plateau at around the 6th month. At 1 year, except for physical symptoms and perceived stress, patient measures recovered to their pre-RT levels. At 1 year, patients had more physical complaints (P < .001) but less perceived stress (P = .002). The percentage of patients who expressed fear of dying dropped from 28% pre-RT to 2% at 1 year. However, patients who expressed "fear of the worst happening" increased from 51% pre-RT to 57% at 1 year. CONCLUSIONS. Different periods in treatment of NPC imposed different psychosocial demands on patients. The current results indicated that the period from diagnosis to 2-month post-RT was a high-risk period both physically and emotionally. After treatment, most patients showed resilience despite persistent side effects of RT and successfully resumed their pretreatment level of functioning by the end of the year. Despite resuming a normal or near-normal living, patients still noted a subdued fear of recurrence. © 2007 American Cancer Society.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationCancer, 2007, v. 109 n. 7, p. 1344-1354 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cncr.22539
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cncr.22539
 
dc.identifier.eissn1097-0142
 
dc.identifier.epage1354
 
dc.identifier.hkuros129561
 
dc.identifier.hkuros212281
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000245229000015
 
dc.identifier.issn0008-543X
2013 Impact Factor: 4.901
 
dc.identifier.issue7
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid17326045
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33947528211
 
dc.identifier.spage1344
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/66672
 
dc.identifier.volume109
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/28741
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofCancer
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsCancer. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
 
dc.subject.meshAdult
 
dc.subject.meshAged
 
dc.subject.meshCarcinoma, Squamous Cell - psychology - radiotherapy
 
dc.subject.meshChina - epidemiology
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
 
dc.subject.meshNasopharyngeal Neoplasms - psychology - radiotherapy
 
dc.subject.meshPatient Satisfaction
 
dc.subject.meshProspective Studies
 
dc.subject.meshQuality of Life - psychology
 
dc.subjectCourse
 
dc.subjectNasopharyngeal cancer
 
dc.subjectPsychological response
 
dc.subjectPsychosocial impact
 
dc.subjectRadiotherapy
 
dc.titleA prospective study of the impact of nasopharyngeal cancer and radiotherapy on the psychosocial condition of Chinese patients
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Pow, EHN</contributor.author>
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<contributor.author>Au, GKH</contributor.author>
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<description.abstract>BACKGROUND. Radiotherapy (RT) promises optimistic results in the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). The objective of the current study was to map out prospectively the impact of NPC and RT on patients from diagnosis to 1 year posttreatment. METHODS. For this study, 67 Chinese patients (46 men and 21 women) with newly diagnosed stage I or II NPC who received primary RT were recruited. Physical and psychosocial adjustments were measured by using the Rotterdam Symptom Checklist, Beck Anxiety Inventory, Beck Depression Inventory, Perceived Stress Scale, and the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). Semistructured clinical interviews were conducted at bimonthly intervals from pre-RT to 1 year post-RT. RESULTS. Physical and psychosocial adjustments were poorest from pre-RT to the end of RT. Rapid improvements in all areas were noted in the first 2 months post-RT and reached a plateau at around the 6th month. At 1 year, except for physical symptoms and perceived stress, patient measures recovered to their pre-RT levels. At 1 year, patients had more physical complaints (P &lt; .001) but less perceived stress (P = .002). The percentage of patients who expressed fear of dying dropped from 28% pre-RT to 2% at 1 year. However, patients who expressed &quot;fear of the worst happening&quot; increased from 51% pre-RT to 57% at 1 year. CONCLUSIONS. Different periods in treatment of NPC imposed different psychosocial demands on patients. The current results indicated that the period from diagnosis to 2-month post-RT was a high-risk period both physically and emotionally. After treatment, most patients showed resilience despite persistent side effects of RT and successfully resumed their pretreatment level of functioning by the end of the year. Despite resuming a normal or near-normal living, patients still noted a subdued fear of recurrence. &#169; 2007 American Cancer Society.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Queen Mary Hospital Hong Kong