File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Genotypic diversity of oral Actinomyces naeslundii genospecies 1 and 2 in caries-active preschool children

TitleGenotypic diversity of oral Actinomyces naeslundii genospecies 1 and 2 in caries-active preschool children
Authors
KeywordsActinomyces
Caries
Genetic diversity
Primary dentition
Issue Date2004
PublisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/OMI
Citation
Oral Microbiology And Immunology, 2004, v. 19 n. 6, p. 371-378 How to Cite?
AbstractA total of 991 isolates of Actinomyces naeslundii were obtained from sound approximal tooth sites in either caries-active (n = 35) or caries-free (n = 20) preschool children. From this group of isolates, 101 strains were chosen to study the genotypic diversity of A. naeslundii genospecies 1 (n = 30), catalase-positive (n = 30), and catalase-negative genospecies 2 (n = 41). Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism PCR-RPLP), with a pair of primers targeting the 16S ribosome RNA gene (16S rDNA), and Mn/I digestion together with randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) with eight arbitrary, single 10-mer primers were performed to generate genetic profiles of selected Actinomyces isolates. The hierarchic relationships of genetic profiles were finally analyzed using computerized dendrograms. There was no significant difference in the prevalence rates and proportions of either genospecies 1 or 2 between the caries-free and caries-active groups, although a higher prevalence of genospecies 2 was noted in the total population. Dendrogram analyses of the 16S rDNA PCR-RFLP profiles revealed that all strains belonging to A. naeslundii genospecies 1 could be subgrouped into three genotypes (T7, T18, and T19), with a single predominant genotype, T18 (27/30). Catalase-positive strains for genospecies 2 fell into three subtypes (T4, T7, and T17), whereas the catalase-negative counterparts were distributed amongst 16 subtypes. No specific genotype was significantly associated with caries activity. We conclude that heterogeneous subgroups of A. naeslundii genospecies 1 and 2, particularly the latter, are the constituent flora of dental plaque in children and may contribute to the pathogenesis of childhood caries.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/66606
ISSN
2011 Impact Factor: 2.807
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTang, Gen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSamaranayake, LPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYip, HKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T05:47:47Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T05:47:47Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationOral Microbiology And Immunology, 2004, v. 19 n. 6, p. 371-378en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0902-0055en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/66606-
dc.description.abstractA total of 991 isolates of Actinomyces naeslundii were obtained from sound approximal tooth sites in either caries-active (n = 35) or caries-free (n = 20) preschool children. From this group of isolates, 101 strains were chosen to study the genotypic diversity of A. naeslundii genospecies 1 (n = 30), catalase-positive (n = 30), and catalase-negative genospecies 2 (n = 41). Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism PCR-RPLP), with a pair of primers targeting the 16S ribosome RNA gene (16S rDNA), and Mn/I digestion together with randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) with eight arbitrary, single 10-mer primers were performed to generate genetic profiles of selected Actinomyces isolates. The hierarchic relationships of genetic profiles were finally analyzed using computerized dendrograms. There was no significant difference in the prevalence rates and proportions of either genospecies 1 or 2 between the caries-free and caries-active groups, although a higher prevalence of genospecies 2 was noted in the total population. Dendrogram analyses of the 16S rDNA PCR-RFLP profiles revealed that all strains belonging to A. naeslundii genospecies 1 could be subgrouped into three genotypes (T7, T18, and T19), with a single predominant genotype, T18 (27/30). Catalase-positive strains for genospecies 2 fell into three subtypes (T4, T7, and T17), whereas the catalase-negative counterparts were distributed amongst 16 subtypes. No specific genotype was significantly associated with caries activity. We conclude that heterogeneous subgroups of A. naeslundii genospecies 1 and 2, particularly the latter, are the constituent flora of dental plaque in children and may contribute to the pathogenesis of childhood caries.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/OMIen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofOral Microbiology and Immunologyen_HK
dc.subjectActinomycesen_HK
dc.subjectCariesen_HK
dc.subjectGenetic diversityen_HK
dc.subjectPrimary dentitionen_HK
dc.subject.meshActinomyces - classification - genetics - pathogenicityen_HK
dc.subject.meshBacterial Typing Techniquesen_HK
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_HK
dc.subject.meshDNA, Bacterial - analysisen_HK
dc.subject.meshDental Caries - microbiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshDental Plaque - microbiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshGenetic Variationen_HK
dc.subject.meshGenotypeen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshPolymerase Chain Reactionen_HK
dc.subject.meshPolymorphism, Restriction Fragment Lengthen_HK
dc.subject.meshRandom Amplified Polymorphic DNA Techniqueen_HK
dc.subject.meshStatistics, Nonparametricen_HK
dc.titleGenotypic diversity of oral Actinomyces naeslundii genospecies 1 and 2 in caries-active preschool childrenen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0902-0055&volume=19&spage=371&epage=378&date=2004&atitle=Genotypic+diversity+of+oral+Actinomyces+naeslundii+genospecies+1+and+2+in+caries-active+preschool+childrenen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSamaranayake, LP: lakshman@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailYip, HK: kevin.h.k.yip@hkusua.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySamaranayake, LP=rp00023en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYip, HK=rp00027en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1399-302x.2004.00171.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid15491462-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-8444248823en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros95421en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-8444248823&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume19en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage371en_HK
dc.identifier.epage378en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000224522500004-
dc.publisher.placeDenmarken_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTang, G=36882453100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSamaranayake, LP=7102761002en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYip, HK=25423244900en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats