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Article: Characteristics of medical research news reported on front pages of newspapers
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TitleCharacteristics of medical research news reported on front pages of newspapers
 
AuthorsLai, WYY1
Lane, T2
 
Issue Date2009
 
PublisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.action
 
CitationPlos One, 2009, v. 4 n. 7 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0006103
 
AbstractBackground: The placement of medical research news on a newspaper's front page is intended to gain the public's attention, so it is important to understand the source of the news in terms of research maturity and evidence level. Methodology/Principal Findings: We searched LexisNexis to identify medical research reported on front pages of major newspapers published from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2002. We used MEDLINE and Google Scholar to find journal articles corresponding to the research, and determined their evidence level. Of 734 front-page medical research stories identified, 417 (57%) referred to mature research published in peer-reviewed journals. The remaining 317 stories referred to preliminary findings presented at scientific or press meetings; 144 (45%) of those stories mentioned studies that later matured (i.e. were published in journals within 3 years after news coverage). The evidence-level distribution of the 515 journal articles quoted in news stories reporting on mature research (3% level I, 21% level II, 42% level III, 4% level IV, and 31% level V) differed from that of the 170 reports of preliminary research that later matured (1%, 19%, 35%, 12%, and 33%, respectively; chi-square test, P = .0009). No news stories indicated evidence level. Fewer than 1 in 5 news stories reporting preliminary findings acknowledged the preliminary nature of their content. Conclusions/Significance: Only 57% of front-page stories reporting on medical research are based on mature research, which tends to have a higher evidence level than research with preliminary findings. Medical research news should be clearly referenced and state the evidence level and limitations to inform the public of the maturity and quality of the source. © 2009 Lai, Lane.
 
ISSN1932-6203
2012 Impact Factor: 3.73
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.512
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0006103
 
PubMed Central IDPMC2699539
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000267572200006
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLai, WYY
 
dc.contributor.authorLane, T
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T05:45:53Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T05:45:53Z
 
dc.date.issued2009
 
dc.description.abstractBackground: The placement of medical research news on a newspaper's front page is intended to gain the public's attention, so it is important to understand the source of the news in terms of research maturity and evidence level. Methodology/Principal Findings: We searched LexisNexis to identify medical research reported on front pages of major newspapers published from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2002. We used MEDLINE and Google Scholar to find journal articles corresponding to the research, and determined their evidence level. Of 734 front-page medical research stories identified, 417 (57%) referred to mature research published in peer-reviewed journals. The remaining 317 stories referred to preliminary findings presented at scientific or press meetings; 144 (45%) of those stories mentioned studies that later matured (i.e. were published in journals within 3 years after news coverage). The evidence-level distribution of the 515 journal articles quoted in news stories reporting on mature research (3% level I, 21% level II, 42% level III, 4% level IV, and 31% level V) differed from that of the 170 reports of preliminary research that later matured (1%, 19%, 35%, 12%, and 33%, respectively; chi-square test, P = .0009). No news stories indicated evidence level. Fewer than 1 in 5 news stories reporting preliminary findings acknowledged the preliminary nature of their content. Conclusions/Significance: Only 57% of front-page stories reporting on medical research are based on mature research, which tends to have a higher evidence level than research with preliminary findings. Medical research news should be clearly referenced and state the evidence level and limitations to inform the public of the maturity and quality of the source. © 2009 Lai, Lane.
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.identifier.citationPlos One, 2009, v. 4 n. 7 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0006103
 
dc.identifier.citeulike5079889
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0006103
 
dc.identifier.epagee6103
 
dc.identifier.hkuros167039
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000267572200006
 
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
2012 Impact Factor: 3.73
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.512
 
dc.identifier.issue7
 
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2699539
 
dc.identifier.pmid19568422
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-67749103822
 
dc.identifier.spagee6103
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/66381
 
dc.identifier.volume4
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.action
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS ONE
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.subject.meshBiomedical Research
 
dc.subject.meshNewspapers
 
dc.titleCharacteristics of medical research news reported on front pages of newspapers
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<description.abstract>Background: The placement of medical research news on a newspaper&apos;s front page is intended to gain the public&apos;s attention, so it is important to understand the source of the news in terms of research maturity and evidence level. Methodology/Principal Findings: We searched LexisNexis to identify medical research reported on front pages of major newspapers published from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2002. We used MEDLINE and Google Scholar to find journal articles corresponding to the research, and determined their evidence level. Of 734 front-page medical research stories identified, 417 (57%) referred to mature research published in peer-reviewed journals. The remaining 317 stories referred to preliminary findings presented at scientific or press meetings; 144 (45%) of those stories mentioned studies that later matured (i.e. were published in journals within 3 years after news coverage). The evidence-level distribution of the 515 journal articles quoted in news stories reporting on mature research (3% level I, 21% level II, 42% level III, 4% level IV, and 31% level V) differed from that of the 170 reports of preliminary research that later matured (1%, 19%, 35%, 12%, and 33%, respectively; chi-square test, P = .0009). No news stories indicated evidence level. Fewer than 1 in 5 news stories reporting preliminary findings acknowledged the preliminary nature of their content. Conclusions/Significance: Only 57% of front-page stories reporting on medical research are based on mature research, which tends to have a higher evidence level than research with preliminary findings. Medical research news should be clearly referenced and state the evidence level and limitations to inform the public of the maturity and quality of the source. &#169; 2009 Lai, Lane.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Prince Philip Dental Hospital