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Article: A comparison of the validity of generic- and disease-specific measures in the assessment of oral health-related quality of life

TitleA comparison of the validity of generic- and disease-specific measures in the assessment of oral health-related quality of life
Authors
KeywordsDentate
Edentulous
Implants
Quality of life
Validity
Issue Date1999
PublisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/COM
Citation
Community Dentistry And Oral Epidemiology, 1999, v. 27 n. 5, p. 344-352 How to Cite?
AbstractIn recent years, a number of instruments have been developed to measure the outcomes of oral disease. The Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP) is the most sophisticated and comprehensive measure developed to date. At present, reports of the use of this measure are confined to descriptive population studies. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the validity of the OHIP with a generic health-related quality of life measure, the SF36. Methods: Study subjects were in three groups, namely, edentulous patients seeking dental implants ("implant subjects", n=32), edentulous patients seeking conventional dentures ("edentulous control", n=35) and dentate patients ("dentate control", n=21). All subjects completed an OHIP and SF36 prior to receiving any treatment. The edentulous subjects also completed a subjective assessment of satisfaction with their existing conventional dentures. OHIP data were computed using the simple count and weighted scores methods. Results: The median number of negative impacts reported for each group was: 17 (implant subjects), six (conventional control) and one (dentate control). OHIP sub-scale scores were significantly higher (P<0.001) for implant subjects than control subjects. There were no significant differences between the SF36 sub-scale scores. There was a significant correlation (P≤0.01) between aspects of satisfaction with conventional dentures worn by the edentulous subjects and OHIP sub-scale scores. Correlations between denture satisfaction variables and SF36 scores were not significant. Conclusions: It was concluded that the OHIP shows good discriminant and construct validity properties. As it is oral specific, it will be of greater use in measuring outcomes of oral disorders than generic measures such as SF36. This finding will be relevant when considering the use of health-related quality of life measures to target resources and measure the outcome of clinical intervention.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/66344
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.233
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.111
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAllen, PFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMcMillan, ASen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWalshaw, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorLocker, Den_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T05:45:34Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T05:45:34Z-
dc.date.issued1999en_HK
dc.identifier.citationCommunity Dentistry And Oral Epidemiology, 1999, v. 27 n. 5, p. 344-352en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0301-5661en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/66344-
dc.description.abstractIn recent years, a number of instruments have been developed to measure the outcomes of oral disease. The Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP) is the most sophisticated and comprehensive measure developed to date. At present, reports of the use of this measure are confined to descriptive population studies. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the validity of the OHIP with a generic health-related quality of life measure, the SF36. Methods: Study subjects were in three groups, namely, edentulous patients seeking dental implants ("implant subjects", n=32), edentulous patients seeking conventional dentures ("edentulous control", n=35) and dentate patients ("dentate control", n=21). All subjects completed an OHIP and SF36 prior to receiving any treatment. The edentulous subjects also completed a subjective assessment of satisfaction with their existing conventional dentures. OHIP data were computed using the simple count and weighted scores methods. Results: The median number of negative impacts reported for each group was: 17 (implant subjects), six (conventional control) and one (dentate control). OHIP sub-scale scores were significantly higher (P<0.001) for implant subjects than control subjects. There were no significant differences between the SF36 sub-scale scores. There was a significant correlation (P≤0.01) between aspects of satisfaction with conventional dentures worn by the edentulous subjects and OHIP sub-scale scores. Correlations between denture satisfaction variables and SF36 scores were not significant. Conclusions: It was concluded that the OHIP shows good discriminant and construct validity properties. As it is oral specific, it will be of greater use in measuring outcomes of oral disorders than generic measures such as SF36. This finding will be relevant when considering the use of health-related quality of life measures to target resources and measure the outcome of clinical intervention.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/COMen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofCommunity Dentistry and Oral Epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subjectDentateen_HK
dc.subjectEdentulousen_HK
dc.subjectImplantsen_HK
dc.subjectQuality of lifeen_HK
dc.subjectValidityen_HK
dc.titleA comparison of the validity of generic- and disease-specific measures in the assessment of oral health-related quality of lifeen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0301-5661&volume=27&spage=344&epage=352&date=1999&atitle=A+comparison+of+the+validity+of+generic-+and+disease-specific+measures+in+the+assessment+of+oral+health-related+quality+of+lifeen_HK
dc.identifier.emailMcMillan, AS: annemcmillan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMcMillan, AS=rp00014en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1600-0528.1999.tb02031.x-
dc.identifier.pmid10503795en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0033208624en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros49451en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0033208624&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume27en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage344en_HK
dc.identifier.epage352en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000082672500006-
dc.publisher.placeDenmarken_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAllen, PF=7403501534en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcMillan, AS=7102843317en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWalshaw, D=6701842829en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLocker, D=7102044567en_HK

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