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Article: Factors affecting the adherence of Candida albicans to human buccal epithelial cells in human immunodeficiency virus infection

TitleFactors affecting the adherence of Candida albicans to human buccal epithelial cells in human immunodeficiency virus infection
Authors
Issue Date1999
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/BJD
Citation
British Journal Of Dermatology, 1999, v. 141 n. 5, p. 852-858 How to Cite?
AbstractAdherence to host surfaces is an essential prerequisite for colonization and infection. We compared the adherence of 15 oral isolates of Candida albicans harvested from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals and 12 isolates from HIV-free individuals to buccal epithelial cells (BECs) from HIV-free individuals, and the adherence of a reference strain of C. albicans to BECs from HIV-infected as well as HIV-free individuals. C. albicans from HIV-infected individuals showed adherence values similar to those from HIV-free individuals. The clinical and laboratory parameters of the subjects from whom the Candida were isolated did not correlate with adherence. A reference strain of C. albicans (GDH 1957), however, adhered more readily to BECs from HIV-infected individuals than to cells from an HIV-free cohort. Several variables were found to be associated with the adherence of C. albicans to BECs from HIV-infected individuals: use of zidovudine, antibacterials and antiparasitics was associated with increased adhesion, while haemophilia, heterosexuality, bisexuality, increased age, decreased CD4 + count and use of folate were associated with a decreased candidal adhesion (all P < 0.05). Our data suggest that the quality of BECs including their receptivity to Candida may play an important part in increasing the oral yeast carriage in HIV infection.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/66194
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 4.275
2014 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.741
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTsang, CSPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSamaranayake, LPen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T05:44:21Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T05:44:21Z-
dc.date.issued1999en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal Of Dermatology, 1999, v. 141 n. 5, p. 852-858en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0007-0963en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/66194-
dc.description.abstractAdherence to host surfaces is an essential prerequisite for colonization and infection. We compared the adherence of 15 oral isolates of Candida albicans harvested from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals and 12 isolates from HIV-free individuals to buccal epithelial cells (BECs) from HIV-free individuals, and the adherence of a reference strain of C. albicans to BECs from HIV-infected as well as HIV-free individuals. C. albicans from HIV-infected individuals showed adherence values similar to those from HIV-free individuals. The clinical and laboratory parameters of the subjects from whom the Candida were isolated did not correlate with adherence. A reference strain of C. albicans (GDH 1957), however, adhered more readily to BECs from HIV-infected individuals than to cells from an HIV-free cohort. Several variables were found to be associated with the adherence of C. albicans to BECs from HIV-infected individuals: use of zidovudine, antibacterials and antiparasitics was associated with increased adhesion, while haemophilia, heterosexuality, bisexuality, increased age, decreased CD4 + count and use of folate were associated with a decreased candidal adhesion (all P < 0.05). Our data suggest that the quality of BECs including their receptivity to Candida may play an important part in increasing the oral yeast carriage in HIV infection.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/BJDen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBritish Journal of Dermatologyen_HK
dc.rightsBritish Journal of Dermatology. Copyright © Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.subject.meshAIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections - microbiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshCandida albicans - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshCandidiasis, Oral - microbiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshCell Adhesionen_HK
dc.subject.meshCell Culture Techniquesen_HK
dc.subject.meshEpithelial Cells - microbiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshLogistic Modelsen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMouth Mucosa - microbiologyen_HK
dc.titleFactors affecting the adherence of Candida albicans to human buccal epithelial cells in human immunodeficiency virus infectionen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0007-0963&volume=141&spage=852&epage=858&date=1999&atitle=Factors+affecting+the+adherence+of+Candida+albicans+to+human+buccal+epithelial+cells+in+human+immunodeficiency+virus+infectionen_HK
dc.identifier.emailTsang, CSP:csptsang@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSamaranayake, LP:lakshman@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTsang, CSP=rp00026en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySamaranayake, LP=rp00023en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1046/j.1365-2133.1999.03158.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid10583166-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0032760172en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros47543en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0032760172&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume141en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage852en_HK
dc.identifier.epage858en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000084218100012-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTsang, CSP=7202936002en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSamaranayake, LP=7102761002en_HK

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