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Article: Mechanical Disruption of Dentin Collagen Fibrils during Resin-Dentin Bond Testing

TitleMechanical Disruption of Dentin Collagen Fibrils during Resin-Dentin Bond Testing
Authors
Issue Date2000
PublisherQuintessence Publishing Co Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.quintessencepublishing.co.uk/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=3&products_id=243
Citation
Journal Of Adhesive Dentistry, 2000, v. 2 n. 3, p. 175-192 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: To determine if collagen fibrils on the dentin side of failed resin-dentin interfaces undergo mechanical disruption during microtensile bond testing. Materials and Methods: Extracted, caries-free human third molars were divided into four groups. The occlusal enamel was removed, leaving a flat dentin surface for bonding. Resin composite buildups were made after the acid-conditioned dentin was bonded with either Single Bond (S) or One-Step (0), and using either moist bonding (M) or air drying for 5 s (D). After storage in water for 24 h, the teeth were vertically sectioned into an array of 0.9 x 0.9 mm resin composite-dentin beams. They were stressed to failure using the nontrimming version of the microtensile bond test. Fractured dentin and resin composite sides of representative beams from each group that exhibited adhesive failures under light microscopy examination were prepared for scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results: A two-way ANOVA showed that moist bond strengths were significantly higher than those made to dry dentin (M > D; p < 0.001), but that there was no difference between the adhesives (S vs 0; p = 0.547). SEM analysis showed the presence of loose collagen fibrils within fractured hybrid layers in the dry groups, but not in the moist groups. TEM examination of the dry-bonded groups revealed collagen fibrils that were thinner and exhibited abnormally wide interfibrillar spaces when hybrid layers were intact. Within dry-bonded fractured hybrid layers, broad mechanical disruption zones could be seen, consisting of fibrils that were devoid of cross banding, defibrillation of the subfibrillar architecture, and gross disaggregation into microfibrils. In the moist-bonded groups, only short mechanical disruption zones were found along the torn edges of the collagen fibrils. The rest of the fibrils beyond the fracture site were intact and retained their periodicity. Mechanical testing of demineralized matrices yielded a maximum modulus of elasticity of 43.9 ±6.1 MPa. Conclusion: We speculate that adhesive resin has a protective function for demineralized collagen in wellinfiltrated hybrid layers. We propose that both the collagen and resin contribute to load sharing during stress application until the final moment of rupture. On the other hand, collagen fibrils in poorly infiltrated hybrid layers, being unsupported by resin, undergo various degrees of irreversible mechanical disruption depending on how the stress is dissipated. The collagen fibril network has a much lower modulus of elasticity compared to those of resin-infiltrated fibrils or the demineralized dentin.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/66158
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.594
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.486
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTay, FRen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCarvalho, RMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYiu, CKYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKing, NMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAgee, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorBouillaguet, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPashley, DHen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T05:44:03Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T05:44:03Z-
dc.date.issued2000en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Adhesive Dentistry, 2000, v. 2 n. 3, p. 175-192en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1461-5185en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/66158-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To determine if collagen fibrils on the dentin side of failed resin-dentin interfaces undergo mechanical disruption during microtensile bond testing. Materials and Methods: Extracted, caries-free human third molars were divided into four groups. The occlusal enamel was removed, leaving a flat dentin surface for bonding. Resin composite buildups were made after the acid-conditioned dentin was bonded with either Single Bond (S) or One-Step (0), and using either moist bonding (M) or air drying for 5 s (D). After storage in water for 24 h, the teeth were vertically sectioned into an array of 0.9 x 0.9 mm resin composite-dentin beams. They were stressed to failure using the nontrimming version of the microtensile bond test. Fractured dentin and resin composite sides of representative beams from each group that exhibited adhesive failures under light microscopy examination were prepared for scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results: A two-way ANOVA showed that moist bond strengths were significantly higher than those made to dry dentin (M > D; p < 0.001), but that there was no difference between the adhesives (S vs 0; p = 0.547). SEM analysis showed the presence of loose collagen fibrils within fractured hybrid layers in the dry groups, but not in the moist groups. TEM examination of the dry-bonded groups revealed collagen fibrils that were thinner and exhibited abnormally wide interfibrillar spaces when hybrid layers were intact. Within dry-bonded fractured hybrid layers, broad mechanical disruption zones could be seen, consisting of fibrils that were devoid of cross banding, defibrillation of the subfibrillar architecture, and gross disaggregation into microfibrils. In the moist-bonded groups, only short mechanical disruption zones were found along the torn edges of the collagen fibrils. The rest of the fibrils beyond the fracture site were intact and retained their periodicity. Mechanical testing of demineralized matrices yielded a maximum modulus of elasticity of 43.9 ±6.1 MPa. Conclusion: We speculate that adhesive resin has a protective function for demineralized collagen in wellinfiltrated hybrid layers. We propose that both the collagen and resin contribute to load sharing during stress application until the final moment of rupture. On the other hand, collagen fibrils in poorly infiltrated hybrid layers, being unsupported by resin, undergo various degrees of irreversible mechanical disruption depending on how the stress is dissipated. The collagen fibril network has a much lower modulus of elasticity compared to those of resin-infiltrated fibrils or the demineralized dentin.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherQuintessence Publishing Co Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.quintessencepublishing.co.uk/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=3&products_id=243en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Adhesive Dentistryen_HK
dc.subject.meshAcid Etching, Dentalen_HK
dc.subject.meshAiren_HK
dc.subject.meshAnalysis of Varianceen_HK
dc.subject.meshBisphenol A-Glycidyl Methacrylate - chemistryen_HK
dc.subject.meshCollagen - physiology - ultrastructureen_HK
dc.subject.meshComposite Resins - chemistryen_HK
dc.subject.meshDental Bondingen_HK
dc.subject.meshDentin - physiology - ultrastructureen_HK
dc.subject.meshDentin-Bonding Agents - chemistryen_HK
dc.subject.meshDesiccationen_HK
dc.subject.meshElasticityen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaterials Testingen_HK
dc.subject.meshMethacrylates - chemistryen_HK
dc.subject.meshMicroscopy, Electronen_HK
dc.subject.meshMicroscopy, Electron, Scanningen_HK
dc.subject.meshMolar, Thirden_HK
dc.subject.meshStatistics as Topicen_HK
dc.subject.meshSurface Propertiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshTensile Strengthen_HK
dc.subject.meshWateren_HK
dc.titleMechanical Disruption of Dentin Collagen Fibrils during Resin-Dentin Bond Testingen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1461-5185&volume=2&spage=175&epage=192&date=2000&atitle=Mechanical+disruption+of+dentin+collagen+fibrils+during+resin-dentin+bond+testingen_HK
dc.identifier.emailYiu, CKY: ckyyiu@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailKing, NM: hhdbknm@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYiu, CKY=rp00018en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKing, NM=rp00006en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid11317391-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0034279951en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros56115en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0034279951&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume2en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage175en_HK
dc.identifier.epage192en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTay, FR=7102091962en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCarvalho, RM=7103357029en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYiu, CKY=7007115156en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKing, NM=7201762850en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, Y=7601310723en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAgee, K=35601532800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBouillaguet, S=7004592630en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPashley, DH=35448600800en_HK

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