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Article: Prevalence of oral Candida species in leprosy patients from Cambodia and Thailand

TitlePrevalence of oral Candida species in leprosy patients from Cambodia and Thailand
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/JOPM
Citation
Journal Of Oral Pathology And Medicine, 2007, v. 36 n. 6, p. 342-346 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Leprosy is a chronic bacterial infection which may lead to significant orofacial morbidity. However, reports on the oral mycotic flora of leprosy patients are rare. The aim of the current study was to explore the oral yeast carriage in two groups of leprosy patients. Methods: 40 Cambodian (seven men, 33 women) and 48 Thai (14 men, 34 women) leprosy patients from Leprosy Rehabilitation Centre Khien Kleang, Phnom Penh, Cambodia and McKean Rehabilitation Center, Chiangmai, Thailand were randomly selected and their demographic data and clinical history were recorded. Tongue and palatal swabs of each patient were collected using sterile Fungi-Quick swabs (Hain Diagnostika, Nehren, Germany) and they were cultured aerobically on Sabouraud's dextrose agar and CHROMAgar (CHROMagar, Paris, France). Yeast were identified by germ tube, chlamydospore production, and assimilation tests (API 20C AUX, Bio-Merieux, Marcy l'Etoile, France) and reconfirmed using APILAB Plus system (Bio-Merieux). Results: Two groups (Cambodian and Thai) had median age of 35 and 64 years. They had been with leprosy for median durations of 17.7 and 38.9 years (P < 0.05), respectively. Overall yeast carriage in two cohorts were 80% and 93.75%. Candida albicans had highest carriage rate in either group (65.6%, 44.4%). Candida krusei and C. glabrata existed as second-line colonizers after C. albicans. Candida glabrata carriage was significantly higher in Thai patients (P < 0.05). Multispecies carriage was seen in three Cambodian (9.4%) and five Thai (11.5%) patients. Conclusions: This study indicates high oral yeast carriage in leprosy patients. Candida albicans remains predominant while C. krusei and C. glabrata are second-line oral colonizers. Co-inhabitation of multiple yeast species is also noted in these patients' oral mycotic flora. © 2007 Blackwell Munksgaard.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/66146
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.859
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.731
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorReichart, PAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSamaranayake, LPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBendick, Chen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSchmidtWesthausen, AMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJayatilake, JAMSen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T05:43:57Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T05:43:57Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Oral Pathology And Medicine, 2007, v. 36 n. 6, p. 342-346en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0904-2512en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/66146-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Leprosy is a chronic bacterial infection which may lead to significant orofacial morbidity. However, reports on the oral mycotic flora of leprosy patients are rare. The aim of the current study was to explore the oral yeast carriage in two groups of leprosy patients. Methods: 40 Cambodian (seven men, 33 women) and 48 Thai (14 men, 34 women) leprosy patients from Leprosy Rehabilitation Centre Khien Kleang, Phnom Penh, Cambodia and McKean Rehabilitation Center, Chiangmai, Thailand were randomly selected and their demographic data and clinical history were recorded. Tongue and palatal swabs of each patient were collected using sterile Fungi-Quick swabs (Hain Diagnostika, Nehren, Germany) and they were cultured aerobically on Sabouraud's dextrose agar and CHROMAgar (CHROMagar, Paris, France). Yeast were identified by germ tube, chlamydospore production, and assimilation tests (API 20C AUX, Bio-Merieux, Marcy l'Etoile, France) and reconfirmed using APILAB Plus system (Bio-Merieux). Results: Two groups (Cambodian and Thai) had median age of 35 and 64 years. They had been with leprosy for median durations of 17.7 and 38.9 years (P < 0.05), respectively. Overall yeast carriage in two cohorts were 80% and 93.75%. Candida albicans had highest carriage rate in either group (65.6%, 44.4%). Candida krusei and C. glabrata existed as second-line colonizers after C. albicans. Candida glabrata carriage was significantly higher in Thai patients (P < 0.05). Multispecies carriage was seen in three Cambodian (9.4%) and five Thai (11.5%) patients. Conclusions: This study indicates high oral yeast carriage in leprosy patients. Candida albicans remains predominant while C. krusei and C. glabrata are second-line oral colonizers. Co-inhabitation of multiple yeast species is also noted in these patients' oral mycotic flora. © 2007 Blackwell Munksgaard.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/JOPMen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Oral Pathology and Medicineen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshAgeden_HK
dc.subject.meshCambodiaen_HK
dc.subject.meshCandidiasis, Oral - microbiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshCarrier State - microbiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshCohort Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHospitalizationen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshLeprosy - microbiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_HK
dc.subject.meshPalate - microbiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshThailanden_HK
dc.subject.meshTongue - microbiologyen_HK
dc.titlePrevalence of oral Candida species in leprosy patients from Cambodia and Thailanden_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0904-2512&volume=36&spage=342&epage=346&date=2007&atitle=Prevalence+of+oral+Candida+species+in+leprosy+patients+from+Cambodia+and+Thailanden_HK
dc.identifier.emailSamaranayake, LP:lakshman@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySamaranayake, LP=rp00023en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1600-0714.2007.00535.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17559495-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34250014964en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros128374en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34250014964&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume36en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage342en_HK
dc.identifier.epage346en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000247135500004-
dc.publisher.placeDenmarken_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridReichart, PA=7101871704en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSamaranayake, LP=7102761002en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBendick, Ch=6602474374en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchmidtWesthausen, AM=7004337833en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJayatilake, JAMS=8441671500en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike1374035-

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