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Article: The importance of the primary dentition to children - Part 2: Effects of treating carious teeth by extraction

TitleThe importance of the primary dentition to children - Part 2: Effects of treating carious teeth by extraction
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherHong Kong College of Family Physicians. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkcfp.org.hk/
Citation
Hong Kong Practitioner, 2007, v. 29 n. 3, p. 101-107 How to Cite?
AbstractThe short-term consequences of dental caries in primary teeth include pain and infection. Early management of carious lesions in children can prevent such sequelae, lessen the trauma to parents, save costs and time and to provide better quality of oral health. An important function of the primary teeth is to maintain the natural dental arch and to allow the permanent teeth to erupt in an orderly fashion with adequate space. If carious lesions are not treated early, extraction will be the only treatment option, which in turn, depending on the age may have adverse effects on the developing permanent dentition. Children with severe dental caries usually require the extraction of several and, on occasions, all primary teeth. Premature loss of primary teeth by extraction will influence the occlusal relationship and space in the permanent dentition. Children like to have a set of teeth similar to those of their peers and thus avoid ridicule and criticism. Any criticism directed at a child's missing, or unsightly teeth may be traumatic to his/her psychological development. Therefore, carious primary teeth should not be left untreated until extraction becomes the only treatment option. Several restorative approaches and materials are available to restore the primary teeth. However, restorative management of carious teeth is only the first phase of treatment and its success lies in maintaining a favourable oral environment. Therefore, treatment should be definitive yet specific for each individual child, with long term follow-ups and reinforcement of preventive measures.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/66108
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.101
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKing, NMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAnthonappa, RPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorItthagarun, Aen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T05:43:39Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T05:43:39Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationHong Kong Practitioner, 2007, v. 29 n. 3, p. 101-107en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1027-3948en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/66108-
dc.description.abstractThe short-term consequences of dental caries in primary teeth include pain and infection. Early management of carious lesions in children can prevent such sequelae, lessen the trauma to parents, save costs and time and to provide better quality of oral health. An important function of the primary teeth is to maintain the natural dental arch and to allow the permanent teeth to erupt in an orderly fashion with adequate space. If carious lesions are not treated early, extraction will be the only treatment option, which in turn, depending on the age may have adverse effects on the developing permanent dentition. Children with severe dental caries usually require the extraction of several and, on occasions, all primary teeth. Premature loss of primary teeth by extraction will influence the occlusal relationship and space in the permanent dentition. Children like to have a set of teeth similar to those of their peers and thus avoid ridicule and criticism. Any criticism directed at a child's missing, or unsightly teeth may be traumatic to his/her psychological development. Therefore, carious primary teeth should not be left untreated until extraction becomes the only treatment option. Several restorative approaches and materials are available to restore the primary teeth. However, restorative management of carious teeth is only the first phase of treatment and its success lies in maintaining a favourable oral environment. Therefore, treatment should be definitive yet specific for each individual child, with long term follow-ups and reinforcement of preventive measures.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherHong Kong College of Family Physicians. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkcfp.org.hk/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong Practitioneren_HK
dc.titleThe importance of the primary dentition to children - Part 2: Effects of treating carious teeth by extractionen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1027-3948&volume=29&spage=101&epage=107&date=2007&atitle=The+importance+of+the+primary+dentition+to+children+-+Part+2:+effects+of+treating+carious+teeth+by+extractionen_HK
dc.identifier.emailKing, NM: hhdbknm@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKing, NM=rp00006en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34249656197en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros126739en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34249656197&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume29en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage101en_HK
dc.identifier.epage107en_HK
dc.publisher.placeHong Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKing, NM=7201762850en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAnthonappa, RP=16241017100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridItthagarun, A=6701591745en_HK

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