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Article: Characterization of switch phenotypes in Candida albicans biofilms

TitleCharacterization of switch phenotypes in Candida albicans biofilms
Authors
KeywordsBiofilm
Candida albicans
Phenotypic switching
Issue Date2005
PublisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0301-486X
Citation
Mycopathologia, 2005, v. 160 n. 3, p. 191-200 How to Cite?
AbstractThe aim of this study was to characterize switch phenotypes in Candida albicans biofilms. Cells of Candida albicans 192887g biofilms (24 h) were resuspended and these together with their planktonic counterparts were separately inoculated on Lee's medium agar supplemented with arginine and zinc, at 25°C for 9 days, for colony formation. The different switch phenotypes, as reflected by varying colony morphologies, were then examined for their (i) stability under various growth conditions, (ii) carbohydrate assimilation profiles, (iii) susceptibility to the polyene antifungal, nystatin, (iv) adhering and biofilm-forming ability, (v) filamentation, and (vi) growth rate in yeast nitrogen base medium supplemented with 100 mM glucose. Our data showed that the frequency of phenotypic switching in C. albicans biofilms was approximately 1%. Compared with the planktonic yeasts, cells derived from candidal biofilms generated one of the phenotypes less frequently (Chi-square-tests: P = 0.017). The five phenotypes derived from the biofilm growth demonstrated differing profiles for carbohydrate assimilation, adhesion, biofilm formation, filamentation, and growth rate. These findings reported here, for the first time, imply that phenotypic switching in the candidal biofilms differs from that in the planktonic growth, and affects multiple biological attributes. © Springer 2005.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/66092
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.671
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.720
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJin, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSamaranayake, YHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYip, HKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSamaranayake, LPen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T05:43:31Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T05:43:31Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationMycopathologia, 2005, v. 160 n. 3, p. 191-200en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0301-486Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/66092-
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to characterize switch phenotypes in Candida albicans biofilms. Cells of Candida albicans 192887g biofilms (24 h) were resuspended and these together with their planktonic counterparts were separately inoculated on Lee's medium agar supplemented with arginine and zinc, at 25°C for 9 days, for colony formation. The different switch phenotypes, as reflected by varying colony morphologies, were then examined for their (i) stability under various growth conditions, (ii) carbohydrate assimilation profiles, (iii) susceptibility to the polyene antifungal, nystatin, (iv) adhering and biofilm-forming ability, (v) filamentation, and (vi) growth rate in yeast nitrogen base medium supplemented with 100 mM glucose. Our data showed that the frequency of phenotypic switching in C. albicans biofilms was approximately 1%. Compared with the planktonic yeasts, cells derived from candidal biofilms generated one of the phenotypes less frequently (Chi-square-tests: P = 0.017). The five phenotypes derived from the biofilm growth demonstrated differing profiles for carbohydrate assimilation, adhesion, biofilm formation, filamentation, and growth rate. These findings reported here, for the first time, imply that phenotypic switching in the candidal biofilms differs from that in the planktonic growth, and affects multiple biological attributes. © Springer 2005.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0301-486Xen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofMycopathologiaen_HK
dc.subjectBiofilmen_HK
dc.subjectCandida albicansen_HK
dc.subjectPhenotypic switchingen_HK
dc.subject.meshBiofilms - growth & developmenten_HK
dc.subject.meshCandida albicans - classification - drug effects - growth & developmenten_HK
dc.subject.meshCarbohydrate Metabolismen_HK
dc.subject.meshCell Adhesionen_HK
dc.subject.meshCulture Mediaen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshNystatin - pharmacologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshPhenotypeen_HK
dc.subject.meshPlankton - growth & developmenten_HK
dc.titleCharacterization of switch phenotypes in Candida albicans biofilmsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0301-486X&volume=160&spage=191&epage=200&date=2005&atitle=Characterization+of+switch+phenotypes+in+Candida+albicans+biofilmsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSamaranayake, YH: hema@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailYip, HK: kevin.h.k.yip@hkusua.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSamaranayake, LP: lakshman@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySamaranayake, YH=rp00025en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYip, HK=rp00027en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySamaranayake, LP=rp00023en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11046-005-6331-xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16205967-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-26244457945en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros111903en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-26244457945&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume160en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage191en_HK
dc.identifier.epage200en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000234426700001-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJin, Y=55215762600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSamaranayake, YH=6602677237en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYip, HK=25423244900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSamaranayake, LP=7102761002en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike344685-

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