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Article: Influence of sensory deprivation and perturbation of trigeminal afferent fibers on corticomotor control of human tongue musculature

TitleInfluence of sensory deprivation and perturbation of trigeminal afferent fibers on corticomotor control of human tongue musculature
Authors
KeywordsCapsaicin pain
Local anesthesia
Motor control
Transcranial magnetic stimulation
Trigeminal physiology
Issue Date2006
PublisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00221/index.htm
Citation
Experimental Brain Research, 2006, v. 170 n. 2, p. 199-205 How to Cite?
AbstractSeveral recent studies with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) have demonstrated changes in motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in human limb muscles following modulation of sensory afferent inputs, but little is known about the regulation of the human tongue motor control. To test the effect of local anesthesia (LA) of the lingual nerve and topical application of capsaicin stimulation on tongue MEPs. Fourteen volunteers participated (21-30 years) in two randomized sessions; before, during a nerve block of the lingual nerve or topical capsaicin application (30 μl 5%) on the tongue, and after anesthesia or pain had subsided. EMG electrodes were placed on the tongue and the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle (control). EMG signals were amplified, filtered (20 Hz-1 kHz), and sampled at 4 kHz (Nicolet, USA). TMS were delivered with a figure-of-eight coil (Magstim 200, UK). Scalp sites at which EMG responses were evoked in the relaxed tongue or FDI at the lowest stimulus strength were determined, i.e., motor threshold (T). MEPs were assessed using stimulus-response curves in steps of 10% T. Eight stimuli were presented at each stimulus level. The proximal hypoglossal nerve was activated by TMS delivered over the parieto-occipital skull distal to the right ear. Eight stimuli were delivered at 50% of maximum stimulator output. ANOVAs were used to analyze latency and peak-to-peak amplitudes. Capsaicin evoked mild pain (2.8 ± 0.5), and a strong burning sensation (6.2 ± 0.4) on 0-10 visual analogue scales. MEP amplitudes in tongue and FDI were not influenced by capsaicin (P > 0.44) but by stimulus strength (P < 0.001). MEP latencies in tongue (8.9 ± 0.2 ms) and FDI (22.4 ± 0.4 ms) were not affected by capsaicin (P>0.19). Hypoglossal nerve stimulation evoked a short-latency (3.6 ± 0.9 ms) response (mean amplitude 65 ± 9 μV); but was unaffected by capsaicin (P > 0.54). LA did not have any effect on FDI MEPs but was associated with a significant facilitation of tongue MEPs at T+ 50% and T+60% about 50 min after the nerve block in the recovery phase. Also in this condition, the direct motor responses evoked by hypoglossal nerve stimulation remained constant. No direct effect of a strong burning sensation could be shown on peripheral or central corticomotor pathways to the relaxed tongue musculature, however, LA of the lingual nerve (cranial nerve V) seems able to induce a delayed change in corticomotor control of tongue musculature (cranial nerve XII) possibly related to unmasking effects at the cortical level but not completely excluding excitability changes at the brain stem level. © Springer-Verlag 2005.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/66079
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.057
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.140
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHalkjaer, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorMelsen, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorMcMillan, ASen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSvensson, Pen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T05:43:24Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T05:43:24Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationExperimental Brain Research, 2006, v. 170 n. 2, p. 199-205en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0014-4819en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/66079-
dc.description.abstractSeveral recent studies with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) have demonstrated changes in motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in human limb muscles following modulation of sensory afferent inputs, but little is known about the regulation of the human tongue motor control. To test the effect of local anesthesia (LA) of the lingual nerve and topical application of capsaicin stimulation on tongue MEPs. Fourteen volunteers participated (21-30 years) in two randomized sessions; before, during a nerve block of the lingual nerve or topical capsaicin application (30 μl 5%) on the tongue, and after anesthesia or pain had subsided. EMG electrodes were placed on the tongue and the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle (control). EMG signals were amplified, filtered (20 Hz-1 kHz), and sampled at 4 kHz (Nicolet, USA). TMS were delivered with a figure-of-eight coil (Magstim 200, UK). Scalp sites at which EMG responses were evoked in the relaxed tongue or FDI at the lowest stimulus strength were determined, i.e., motor threshold (T). MEPs were assessed using stimulus-response curves in steps of 10% T. Eight stimuli were presented at each stimulus level. The proximal hypoglossal nerve was activated by TMS delivered over the parieto-occipital skull distal to the right ear. Eight stimuli were delivered at 50% of maximum stimulator output. ANOVAs were used to analyze latency and peak-to-peak amplitudes. Capsaicin evoked mild pain (2.8 ± 0.5), and a strong burning sensation (6.2 ± 0.4) on 0-10 visual analogue scales. MEP amplitudes in tongue and FDI were not influenced by capsaicin (P > 0.44) but by stimulus strength (P < 0.001). MEP latencies in tongue (8.9 ± 0.2 ms) and FDI (22.4 ± 0.4 ms) were not affected by capsaicin (P>0.19). Hypoglossal nerve stimulation evoked a short-latency (3.6 ± 0.9 ms) response (mean amplitude 65 ± 9 μV); but was unaffected by capsaicin (P > 0.54). LA did not have any effect on FDI MEPs but was associated with a significant facilitation of tongue MEPs at T+ 50% and T+60% about 50 min after the nerve block in the recovery phase. Also in this condition, the direct motor responses evoked by hypoglossal nerve stimulation remained constant. No direct effect of a strong burning sensation could be shown on peripheral or central corticomotor pathways to the relaxed tongue musculature, however, LA of the lingual nerve (cranial nerve V) seems able to induce a delayed change in corticomotor control of tongue musculature (cranial nerve XII) possibly related to unmasking effects at the cortical level but not completely excluding excitability changes at the brain stem level. © Springer-Verlag 2005.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00221/index.htmen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofExperimental Brain Researchen_HK
dc.subjectCapsaicin painen_HK
dc.subjectLocal anesthesiaen_HK
dc.subjectMotor controlen_HK
dc.subjectTranscranial magnetic stimulationen_HK
dc.subjectTrigeminal physiologyen_HK
dc.titleInfluence of sensory deprivation and perturbation of trigeminal afferent fibers on corticomotor control of human tongue musculatureen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0014-4819&volume=170&issue=2&spage=199&epage=205&date=2006&atitle=Influence+of+sensory+deprivation+and+perturbation+of+trigeminal+afferent+fibers+on+corticomotor+control+of+human+tongue+musculatureen_HK
dc.identifier.emailMcMillan, AS: annemcmillan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMcMillan, AS=rp00014en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00221-005-0199-3en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16328282-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33645117913en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros118885en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33645117913&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume170en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage199en_HK
dc.identifier.epage205en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000236201300007-
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHalkjaer, L=49763132200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMelsen, B=7005380913en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcMillan, AS=7102843317en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSvensson, P=7103121346en_HK

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