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Article: Incidence of neurosensory deficits and recovery after lower third molar surgery: a prospective clinical study of 4338 cases

TitleIncidence of neurosensory deficits and recovery after lower third molar surgery: a prospective clinical study of 4338 cases
Authors
Keywordsneurosensory deficit
neurosensory recovery
third molar surgery
Issue Date2010
PublisherChurchill Livingstone. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ijom
Citation
International Journal Of Oral And Maxillofacial Surgery, 2010, v. 39 n. 4, p. 320-326 How to Cite?
AbstractA prospective study of all lower third molar surgery performed in the outpatient extraction clinic of a teaching dental hospital was conducted from January 1998 through October 2005 to determine the incidence of subsequent neurosensory deficit due to inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) and lingual nerve (LN) injury, to examine possible contributing risk factors and to describe the pattern of recovery. 3595 patients were included (61% female, 39% male; age range, 14-82 years). Of the 4338 lower third molar extractions performed by various grades of operators, 0.35% developed IAN deficit and 0.69% developed LN deficit. Distoangular impaction was found to increase the risk of LN deficit significantly (p < 0.001). Depth of impaction was related to the risk of IAN deficit (p < 0.001). Undergraduates caused more LN deficits (p < 0.001). Sex, age, raising of a lingual flap, protection of LN with a retractor, removal of distolingual cortex, tooth sectioning and difficulty in tooth elevation were not significantly related to IAN or LN injury. Postoperative recovery from IAN and LN deficits was noted most significantly at 3 and 6 months, respectively. By the end of the follow-up period, 67% of IAN deficits and 72% of LN deficits had recovered completely. © 2009 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/66076
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.563
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.854
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, LKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, YYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChow, LKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, MCMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, EKKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFok, YHen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T05:43:23Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T05:43:23Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Oral And Maxillofacial Surgery, 2010, v. 39 n. 4, p. 320-326en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0901-5027en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/66076-
dc.description.abstractA prospective study of all lower third molar surgery performed in the outpatient extraction clinic of a teaching dental hospital was conducted from January 1998 through October 2005 to determine the incidence of subsequent neurosensory deficit due to inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) and lingual nerve (LN) injury, to examine possible contributing risk factors and to describe the pattern of recovery. 3595 patients were included (61% female, 39% male; age range, 14-82 years). Of the 4338 lower third molar extractions performed by various grades of operators, 0.35% developed IAN deficit and 0.69% developed LN deficit. Distoangular impaction was found to increase the risk of LN deficit significantly (p < 0.001). Depth of impaction was related to the risk of IAN deficit (p < 0.001). Undergraduates caused more LN deficits (p < 0.001). Sex, age, raising of a lingual flap, protection of LN with a retractor, removal of distolingual cortex, tooth sectioning and difficulty in tooth elevation were not significantly related to IAN or LN injury. Postoperative recovery from IAN and LN deficits was noted most significantly at 3 and 6 months, respectively. By the end of the follow-up period, 67% of IAN deficits and 72% of LN deficits had recovered completely. © 2009 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherChurchill Livingstone. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ijomen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeryen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectneurosensory deficiten_HK
dc.subjectneurosensory recoveryen_HK
dc.subjectthird molar surgeryen_HK
dc.subject.meshLingual Nerve - injuries-
dc.subject.meshMandibular Nerve - injuries-
dc.subject.meshMolar, Third - surgery-
dc.subject.meshPostoperative Complications - epidemiology-
dc.subject.meshRecovery of Function - physiology-
dc.titleIncidence of neurosensory deficits and recovery after lower third molar surgery: a prospective clinical study of 4338 casesen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0901-5027&volume=39&issue=4&spage=320&epage=326&date=2010&atitle=Incidence+of+neurosensory+deficits+and+recovery+after+lower+third+molar+surgery:+a+prospective+clinical+study+of+4338+casesen_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheung, LK:lkcheung@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, YY:mleung04@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, MCM:mcmwong@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, LK=rp00013en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, YY=rp01522en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, MCM=rp00024en_HK
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijom.2009.11.010en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20061121-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77953135954en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros169834en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros201193-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77953135954&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume39en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage320en_HK
dc.identifier.epage326en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1399-0020-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000277903900002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, LK=7102302747en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, YY=34978641900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChow, LK=7202532968en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, MCM=26029250900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, EKK=36196153400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFok, YH=36196412300en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike10013235-

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