File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Diagnostic sub-types, psychological distress and psychosocial dysfunction in southern Chinese people with temporomandibular disorders

TitleDiagnostic sub-types, psychological distress and psychosocial dysfunction in southern Chinese people with temporomandibular disorders
Authors
KeywordsChinese
Clinical assessment
Psychological
Psychosocial
Research Diagnostic Criteria for temporomandibular disorders
Temporomandibular disorders
Issue Date2008
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd.
Citation
Journal Of Oral Rehabilitation, 2008, v. 35 n. 3, p. 184-190 How to Cite?
AbstractThe study aimed to assess the distribution of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) sub-types, psychological distress and psychosocial dysfunction in southern Chinese people seeking treatment for TMD using Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD) and investigate potential cross-cultural differences in sub-type prevalence and psychosocial impact. Eighty-seven consecutive patients (77 females; 10 males) with a mean age of 39·3 years (s.d. 12·8) newly referred to the specialist TMD clinic at the Prince Philip Dental Hospital, Hong Kong over a 20-month period took part in the study. RDC/TMD history questionnaire and clinical assessment data were used to derive Axis I and II findings. Group I muscle disorders were the most common and found in 57·5% of patients. Group II (disc displacement) disorders were found in 42·5% and 47·1% of the right and left temporomandibular joints (TMJ) respectively. Group III disorders (arthralgia/arthrosis/arthritis) were revealed in 19·5% and 23·0% of right and left TMJ's respectively. In the Axis II assessment, 42·5% of patients had moderate/severe depression scores, 59·7% had moderate/severe somatization scores and based on graded chronic pain scores 15·0% had psychosocial dysfunction (grade III and IV). While acknowledging the small sample size, the distribution of RDC/TMD Axis I and II diagnoses was fairly similar in Chinese TMD patients compared with Western and other Asian patient groups. However, in Chinese patients, myofascial pain with limited jaw opening and TMJ disc displacement with reduction were more common and a significant number experienced psychological distress and psychosocial dysfunction. The findings have implications for the management of TMD in Chinese people. © 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/66064
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.926
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.757
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, LTKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYeung, RWKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, MCMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMcMillan, ASen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T05:43:17Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T05:43:17Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Oral Rehabilitation, 2008, v. 35 n. 3, p. 184-190en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0305-182Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/66064-
dc.description.abstractThe study aimed to assess the distribution of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) sub-types, psychological distress and psychosocial dysfunction in southern Chinese people seeking treatment for TMD using Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD) and investigate potential cross-cultural differences in sub-type prevalence and psychosocial impact. Eighty-seven consecutive patients (77 females; 10 males) with a mean age of 39·3 years (s.d. 12·8) newly referred to the specialist TMD clinic at the Prince Philip Dental Hospital, Hong Kong over a 20-month period took part in the study. RDC/TMD history questionnaire and clinical assessment data were used to derive Axis I and II findings. Group I muscle disorders were the most common and found in 57·5% of patients. Group II (disc displacement) disorders were found in 42·5% and 47·1% of the right and left temporomandibular joints (TMJ) respectively. Group III disorders (arthralgia/arthrosis/arthritis) were revealed in 19·5% and 23·0% of right and left TMJ's respectively. In the Axis II assessment, 42·5% of patients had moderate/severe depression scores, 59·7% had moderate/severe somatization scores and based on graded chronic pain scores 15·0% had psychosocial dysfunction (grade III and IV). While acknowledging the small sample size, the distribution of RDC/TMD Axis I and II diagnoses was fairly similar in Chinese TMD patients compared with Western and other Asian patient groups. However, in Chinese patients, myofascial pain with limited jaw opening and TMJ disc displacement with reduction were more common and a significant number experienced psychological distress and psychosocial dysfunction. The findings have implications for the management of TMD in Chinese people. © 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Oral Rehabilitationen_HK
dc.rightsJournal of Oral Rehabilitation. Copyright © Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.subjectChineseen_HK
dc.subjectClinical assessmenten_HK
dc.subjectPsychologicalen_HK
dc.subjectPsychosocialen_HK
dc.subjectResearch Diagnostic Criteria for temporomandibular disordersen_HK
dc.subjectTemporomandibular disordersen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshDepression - ethnologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshEthnic Groupsen_HK
dc.subject.meshFacial Pain - ethnology - psychologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshStress, Psychologicalen_HK
dc.subject.meshTemporomandibular Joint Dysfunction Syndrome - ethnology - psychologyen_HK
dc.titleDiagnostic sub-types, psychological distress and psychosocial dysfunction in southern Chinese people with temporomandibular disordersen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0305-182X&volume=35&issue=3&spage=184&epage=90&date=2008&atitle=Diagnostic+sub-types,+psychological+distress+and+psychosocial+dysfunction+in+southern+Chinese+people+with+temporomandibular+disordersen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, MCM: mcmwong@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailMcMillan, AS: annemcmillan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, MCM=rp00024en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMcMillan, AS=rp00014en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2842.2007.01792.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18254795-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-38849094692en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros149187en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-38849094692&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume35en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage184en_HK
dc.identifier.epage190en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000252812300003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, LTK=23486025500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYeung, RWK=7102833345en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, MCM=26029250900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcMillan, AS=7102843317en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike2325880-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats