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Article: Oral health of southern Chinese children and adolescents with severe hypodontia

TitleOral health of southern Chinese children and adolescents with severe hypodontia
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0960-7439
Citation
International Journal Of Paediatric Dentistry, 2005, v. 15 n. 4, p. 256-263 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective. The aim of this study was to assess the oral health condition of southern Chinese children and adolescents with severe hypodontia. Methods. This was a cross-sectional clinical study in the dental teaching hospital in Hong Kong. Twenty-five children and adolescents with severe hypodontia, and a comparison group of 25 age- and gender-matched controls took part. Verified clinical examination techniques were used to assess the pattern of missing teeth, tooth spacing, dental caries, periodontal condition, enamel defects, and tooth wear. Statistical comparisons were made between groups using independent Student t-tests and chi-square tests. Results. The mean number of congenitally missing permanent teeth in the severe hypodontia group was 9.1 (SD = 5.0), with the maxillary lateral incisor being the most common missing tooth (14.5%). There were significant space discrepancies in both jaws between groups (P < 0.001). Caries prevalence was low with no difference between groups. There was no difference in periodontal condition between groups, with about half of the participants having no gingival inflammation. The severe hypodontia group had more enamel defects (P = 0.043), enamel hypoplasia (P = 0.044) and tooth wear (P = 0.005) than the comparison group. Three of the severe hypodontia group had ectodermal dysplasia. Conclusions. The oral health condition of southern Chinese children and adolescents with severe hypodontia was good in terms of caries experience and periodontal health. However, the increased prevalence of developmental defects of enamel and tooth wear complicates already complex interim and definitive prosthodontic management, and may increase psychosocial impact. © 2005 BSPD and IAPD.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/66043
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.303
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.721
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, ATYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMcgrath, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMcmillan, ASen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T05:43:07Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T05:43:07Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Paediatric Dentistry, 2005, v. 15 n. 4, p. 256-263en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0960-7439en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/66043-
dc.description.abstractObjective. The aim of this study was to assess the oral health condition of southern Chinese children and adolescents with severe hypodontia. Methods. This was a cross-sectional clinical study in the dental teaching hospital in Hong Kong. Twenty-five children and adolescents with severe hypodontia, and a comparison group of 25 age- and gender-matched controls took part. Verified clinical examination techniques were used to assess the pattern of missing teeth, tooth spacing, dental caries, periodontal condition, enamel defects, and tooth wear. Statistical comparisons were made between groups using independent Student t-tests and chi-square tests. Results. The mean number of congenitally missing permanent teeth in the severe hypodontia group was 9.1 (SD = 5.0), with the maxillary lateral incisor being the most common missing tooth (14.5%). There were significant space discrepancies in both jaws between groups (P < 0.001). Caries prevalence was low with no difference between groups. There was no difference in periodontal condition between groups, with about half of the participants having no gingival inflammation. The severe hypodontia group had more enamel defects (P = 0.043), enamel hypoplasia (P = 0.044) and tooth wear (P = 0.005) than the comparison group. Three of the severe hypodontia group had ectodermal dysplasia. Conclusions. The oral health condition of southern Chinese children and adolescents with severe hypodontia was good in terms of caries experience and periodontal health. However, the increased prevalence of developmental defects of enamel and tooth wear complicates already complex interim and definitive prosthodontic management, and may increase psychosocial impact. © 2005 BSPD and IAPD.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0960-7439en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Paediatric Dentistryen_HK
dc.rightsInternational Journal of Paediatric Dentistry. Copyright © Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_HK
dc.subject.meshAnodontia - complications - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshChi-Square Distributionen_HK
dc.subject.meshChilden_HK
dc.subject.meshChina - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshDMF Indexen_HK
dc.subject.meshDental Caries - complications - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshDental Enamel Hypoplasia - complications - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshOral Healthen_HK
dc.subject.meshPeriodontal Diseases - complications - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen_HK
dc.subject.meshTooth Attrition - complications - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.titleOral health of southern Chinese children and adolescents with severe hypodontiaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0960-7439&volume=15&issue=4&spage=256&epage=63&date=2005&atitle=Oral+health+of+southern+Chinese+children+and+adolescents+with+severe+hypodontiaen_HK
dc.identifier.emailMcgrath, C: mcgrathc@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailMcmillan, AS: annemcmillan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMcgrath, C=rp00037en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMcmillan, AS=rp00014en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-263X.2005.00651.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16011784-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-22444438685en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros118895en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-22444438685&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume15en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage256en_HK
dc.identifier.epage263en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, ATY=36921626600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcgrath, C=7102335507en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcmillan, AS=7102843317en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike244596-

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