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Article: Widespread pain symptoms and psychological distress in southern Chinese with orofacial pain

TitleWidespread pain symptoms and psychological distress in southern Chinese with orofacial pain
Authors
KeywordsChinese
Clinical assessment
Depression
Orofacial pain
Psychological
Somatization
Widespread pain
Issue Date2010
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd.
Citation
Journal Of Oral Rehabilitation, 2010, v. 37 n. 1, p. 2-10 How to Cite?
AbstractThe study investigated the experience of widespread pain (WP) symptoms and psychological distress in southern Chinese with orofacial pain (OFP). A community-based, cross-sectional case-control study involving people aged 35-70 registered with the Hospital Authority/University of Hong Kong Family Medicine Clinic served as the sampling frame. People with recent OFP symptoms and a group without OFP took part. Standard questions were asked about OFP conditions in the previous month. Psychological status was evaluated through depression, and non-specific physical symptoms (NPS) scores were measured with depression and somatization sub-scales of the Symptom Checklist-90. Widespread pain was determined using body outline drawings to identify painful sites prior to a standard clinical examination. Two hundred people with OFP and 200 without OFP participated. Compared with 5·0% in the comparison group (P = 0·005), 13·5% of participants with OFP had WP (OFP/WP). Multiple OFP symptoms were more common in the OFP/WP sub-group than the OFP sub-group without WP (OFP/No WP) (P < 0·002). Sixty-three percent of the OFP/WP sub-group had moderate/severe depression scores compared with 26·0% in the OFP/No WP sub-group (P < 0·001). When pain items were included and excluded, 92·6% and 88·9% of the OFP/WP sub-group had moderate/severe NPS scores, respectively compared with 68·5% and 65·0% in the OFP/No WP sub-group (P = 0·004). Co-morbid WP occurred relatively often in southern Chinese with OFP. Psychological distress was common in OFP sufferers, particularly those with WP. A multidisciplinary approach to treatment including cognitive/behavioural therapy should be considered in Chinese people with OFP as part of a WP pattern. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/66033
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.926
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.757
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

This study was supported by a CRCG grant from the University of Hong Kong.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMcMillan, ASen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, MCMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZheng, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLuo, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, CLKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T05:43:02Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T05:43:02Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Oral Rehabilitation, 2010, v. 37 n. 1, p. 2-10en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0305-182Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/66033-
dc.description.abstractThe study investigated the experience of widespread pain (WP) symptoms and psychological distress in southern Chinese with orofacial pain (OFP). A community-based, cross-sectional case-control study involving people aged 35-70 registered with the Hospital Authority/University of Hong Kong Family Medicine Clinic served as the sampling frame. People with recent OFP symptoms and a group without OFP took part. Standard questions were asked about OFP conditions in the previous month. Psychological status was evaluated through depression, and non-specific physical symptoms (NPS) scores were measured with depression and somatization sub-scales of the Symptom Checklist-90. Widespread pain was determined using body outline drawings to identify painful sites prior to a standard clinical examination. Two hundred people with OFP and 200 without OFP participated. Compared with 5·0% in the comparison group (P = 0·005), 13·5% of participants with OFP had WP (OFP/WP). Multiple OFP symptoms were more common in the OFP/WP sub-group than the OFP sub-group without WP (OFP/No WP) (P < 0·002). Sixty-three percent of the OFP/WP sub-group had moderate/severe depression scores compared with 26·0% in the OFP/No WP sub-group (P < 0·001). When pain items were included and excluded, 92·6% and 88·9% of the OFP/WP sub-group had moderate/severe NPS scores, respectively compared with 68·5% and 65·0% in the OFP/No WP sub-group (P = 0·004). Co-morbid WP occurred relatively often in southern Chinese with OFP. Psychological distress was common in OFP sufferers, particularly those with WP. A multidisciplinary approach to treatment including cognitive/behavioural therapy should be considered in Chinese people with OFP as part of a WP pattern. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Oral Rehabilitationen_HK
dc.rightsJournal of Oral Rehabilitation. Copyright © Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com-
dc.subjectChineseen_HK
dc.subjectClinical assessmenten_HK
dc.subjectDepressionen_HK
dc.subjectOrofacial painen_HK
dc.subjectPsychologicalen_HK
dc.subjectSomatizationen_HK
dc.subjectWidespread painen_HK
dc.subject.meshDepression - complications - psychology-
dc.subject.meshFacial Pain - complications - psychology-
dc.subject.meshPain - complications - psychology-
dc.subject.meshSomatoform Disorders - complications - psychology-
dc.subject.meshStress, Psychological - complications - psychology-
dc.titleWidespread pain symptoms and psychological distress in southern Chinese with orofacial painen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0305-182X&volume=37&issue=1&spage=2&epage=10&date=2010&atitle=Widespread+pain+symptoms+and+psychological+distress+in+southern+Chinese+with+orofacial+painen_HK
dc.identifier.emailMcMillan, AS: annemcmillan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, MCM: mcmwong@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, CLK: clklam@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMcMillan, AS=rp00014en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, MCM=rp00024en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, CLK=rp00350en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2842.2009.02023.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19919620-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-71949119055en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros168739en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros162476-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-71949119055&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume37en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage2en_HK
dc.identifier.epage10en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000272581700002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcMillan, AS=7102843317en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, MCM=26029250900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZheng, J=7403975364en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLuo, Y=49161174100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, CLK=24755913900en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike6374015-

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