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Article: 'Genotypic shuffling' of sequential clones of Candida albicans in HIV-infected individuals with and without symptomatic oral candidiasis

Title'Genotypic shuffling' of sequential clones of Candida albicans in HIV-infected individuals with and without symptomatic oral candidiasis
Authors
Issue Date2003
PublisherSociety for General Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://jmm.sgmjournals.org
Citation
Journal Of Medical Microbiology, 2003, v. 52 n. 4, p. 349-359 How to Cite?
AbstractAlthough HIV-infected individuals harbour multiple strains of oral Candida albicans, little is known of their micro-evolution over time. Therefore, a prospective study was conducted with 16 HIV-infected ethnic Chinese individuals with and without symptoms of oropharyngeal candidiasis to evaluate the genotype distribution of oral C. albicans isolates during HIV disease progression. OraFrinse samples were obtained from all individuals and up to five C. albicans colonies were selected for each visit, over a 12 month period of multiple visits. After identification of isolates using standard mycological criteria, the genetic similarities of yeast isolates within and between sequential clones of C. albicans were assessed by DNA fingerprinting through random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD). The results of RAPD gel profiles and the lineage of each isolate were further analysed using commercially available software. RAPD studies revealed the prevalence of up to 14 different genotypes per individual during the study period, with multiple genotypes isolated simultaneously from a single oral rinse. Computer analysis of RAPD profiles revealed that yeasts isolated over sequential visits from symptomatic individuals demonstrated a striking level of relatedness compared with isolates from asymptomatic individuals. Genetically identical C. albicans strains also formed 'loosely' connected subclusters that overlapped multiple visits, implying genetic 'shuffling' in these isolates during disease progression. These data point to varying evolutionary genetic trends in C. albicans associated with symptomatic oral candidiasis and asymptomatic carriage in HIV disease.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/65919
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.269
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.060
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSamaranayake, YHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSamaranayake, LPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDassanayake, RSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYau, JYYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTsang, WKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, BPKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYeung, KWSen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T05:42:06Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T05:42:06Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Medical Microbiology, 2003, v. 52 n. 4, p. 349-359en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0022-2615en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/65919-
dc.description.abstractAlthough HIV-infected individuals harbour multiple strains of oral Candida albicans, little is known of their micro-evolution over time. Therefore, a prospective study was conducted with 16 HIV-infected ethnic Chinese individuals with and without symptoms of oropharyngeal candidiasis to evaluate the genotype distribution of oral C. albicans isolates during HIV disease progression. OraFrinse samples were obtained from all individuals and up to five C. albicans colonies were selected for each visit, over a 12 month period of multiple visits. After identification of isolates using standard mycological criteria, the genetic similarities of yeast isolates within and between sequential clones of C. albicans were assessed by DNA fingerprinting through random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD). The results of RAPD gel profiles and the lineage of each isolate were further analysed using commercially available software. RAPD studies revealed the prevalence of up to 14 different genotypes per individual during the study period, with multiple genotypes isolated simultaneously from a single oral rinse. Computer analysis of RAPD profiles revealed that yeasts isolated over sequential visits from symptomatic individuals demonstrated a striking level of relatedness compared with isolates from asymptomatic individuals. Genetically identical C. albicans strains also formed 'loosely' connected subclusters that overlapped multiple visits, implying genetic 'shuffling' in these isolates during disease progression. These data point to varying evolutionary genetic trends in C. albicans associated with symptomatic oral candidiasis and asymptomatic carriage in HIV disease.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSociety for General Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://jmm.sgmjournals.orgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Medical Microbiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshAIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections - microbiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshCandida albicans - classification - geneticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshCandidiasis, Oral - complications - microbiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshCluster Analysisen_HK
dc.subject.meshCohort Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshGenetic Variationen_HK
dc.subject.meshGenotypeen_HK
dc.subject.meshHIV Infections - complications - microbiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshLongitudinal Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_HK
dc.subject.meshRandom Amplified Polymorphic DNA Techniqueen_HK
dc.title'Genotypic shuffling' of sequential clones of Candida albicans in HIV-infected individuals with and without symptomatic oral candidiasisen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0022-2615&volume=52&spage=349&epage=359&date=2003&atitle=%27Genotypic+shuffling%27+of+sequential+clones+of+Candida+albicans+in+HIV-infected+individuals+with+and+without+symptomatic+oral+candidiasisen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSamaranayake, YH:hema@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSamaranayake, LP:lakshman@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailTsang, WK:pwktsang@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySamaranayake, YH=rp00025en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySamaranayake, LP=rp00023en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTsang, WK=rp01388en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1099/jmm.0.04972-0en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid12676875-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0037396622en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros76410en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0037396622&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume52en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage349en_HK
dc.identifier.epage359en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000182547700012-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSamaranayake, YH=6602677237en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSamaranayake, LP=7102761002en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDassanayake, RS=6603321318en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYau, JYY=7102167568en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTsang, WK=8334953500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, BPK=7103294773en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYeung, KWS=13304249300en_HK

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