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Article: A plotter for plotting direct and reflected sunlight impinging onto and into buildings

TitleA plotter for plotting direct and reflected sunlight impinging onto and into buildings
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherUniversity of Sydney, Faculty of Architecture. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.arch.usyd.edu.au/asr/
Citation
Architectural Science Review, 2004, v. 47 n. 3, p. 251-261 How to Cite?
AbstractTo comply with insolation requirements of some countries, recommendations have been made on several graphical methods for estimating the shadow of a building or its features cast by sunlight on other features or buildings on the drawing paper. These methods use a series of graphs for estimating the solar shadow. To many architects, these methods are not easy to apprehend and are time-consuming for implementation. Furthermore, many projection lines will have to be drawn on the drawing paper, causing likely confusion and difficulty in identifying each line. There is now software developed for architects and students to help them design for sunlight impinging onto and into buildings. In the learning process of a person, however, physical tools do maintain their contribution, and complement learning with the computer software. Also in the hand sketch design process of an architect, a simple physical tool speeds up his understanding of sunlight directions and helps him compare quickly options of solar design. In pursuing this complementing contribution of the physical tools, a physical plotter has been invented. This tool comprises a circular solar chart of a selected latitude, a rotatable annular angular scale of glass orientation, and a rotatable instantaneous sunlight path line, all inscribed on thin transparent plastic plates. It enables an efficient plotting of sunlight penetration into buildings, and the shadow of an object, such as the corner of a house, cast by sunlight on the ground, with minimum calculations to be made and lines to be drawn. The invented tool also enables directions of sunlight reflected from glass to be quickly drawn. Penetration and shadow effect of the reflected sunlight can also be plotted then by this reported plotter.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/65812
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.627

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, KPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYik, WYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T05:41:08Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T05:41:08Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationArchitectural Science Review, 2004, v. 47 n. 3, p. 251-261en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0003-8628en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/65812-
dc.description.abstractTo comply with insolation requirements of some countries, recommendations have been made on several graphical methods for estimating the shadow of a building or its features cast by sunlight on other features or buildings on the drawing paper. These methods use a series of graphs for estimating the solar shadow. To many architects, these methods are not easy to apprehend and are time-consuming for implementation. Furthermore, many projection lines will have to be drawn on the drawing paper, causing likely confusion and difficulty in identifying each line. There is now software developed for architects and students to help them design for sunlight impinging onto and into buildings. In the learning process of a person, however, physical tools do maintain their contribution, and complement learning with the computer software. Also in the hand sketch design process of an architect, a simple physical tool speeds up his understanding of sunlight directions and helps him compare quickly options of solar design. In pursuing this complementing contribution of the physical tools, a physical plotter has been invented. This tool comprises a circular solar chart of a selected latitude, a rotatable annular angular scale of glass orientation, and a rotatable instantaneous sunlight path line, all inscribed on thin transparent plastic plates. It enables an efficient plotting of sunlight penetration into buildings, and the shadow of an object, such as the corner of a house, cast by sunlight on the ground, with minimum calculations to be made and lines to be drawn. The invented tool also enables directions of sunlight reflected from glass to be quickly drawn. Penetration and shadow effect of the reflected sunlight can also be plotted then by this reported plotter.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherUniversity of Sydney, Faculty of Architecture. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.arch.usyd.edu.au/asr/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofArchitectural Science Reviewen_HK
dc.titleA plotter for plotting direct and reflected sunlight impinging onto and into buildingsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0003-8628&volume=47 &issue=3&spage=251&epage=261&date=2004&atitle=A+plotter+for+plotting+direct+and+reflected+sunlight+impinging+onto+and+into+buildings.en_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheung, KP:kpcheuna@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, KP=rp00996en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-4444264252en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros110042en_HK
dc.identifier.volume47en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage251en_HK
dc.identifier.epage261en_HK
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, KP=11739165900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYik, WY=6506488957en_HK

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