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Article: Language and social identity: An integrationist critique
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TitleLanguage and social identity: An integrationist critique
 
AuthorsPablé, A1
Haas, M2
Christe, N1
 
KeywordsBucholtz, M. and Hall, K.
Ethnography
Harris, R.
Integrational linguistics
Linguistic identity
Sociolinguistics
 
Issue Date2010
 
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/langsci
 
CitationLanguage Sciences, 2010, v. 32 n. 6, p. 671-676 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.langsci.2010.08.004
 
AbstractThe concepts of 'native speaker' and 'mother tongue', which attribute to the individual one fixed underlying 'linguistic identity' (or two in the case of bilinguals), are shunned by sociocultural linguists with an interest in group identities, precisely because identities, while being linguistically constructed, are held by the ethnographer to be 'fluid' and never antecedently given. Sociolinguists working on identity within the sociocultural framework have therefore turned their back on any dialectological questions, preferring to focus on how linguistic features may contextually index a social identity as part of 'styles' (rather than 'varieties of language'). This paper critically examines the work of two American anthropologists and linguists, Mary Bucholtz and Kira Hall, from the vantage point of an integrational critique of linguistics (cf. also Pablé and Haas, 2010). The focal point of our critique is the conviction that 'identities', as first-order communicational phenomena, cannot be the object of scientific empirical research because this presupposes that indexical values are viewed as micro-contextually determined and available to outsiders with an 'insider view'. The integrationist, in turn, sees 'identity' as a metadiscursive label used by lay speakers to cope with their everyday first-order experience. For the integrationist, this is where identity research begins and ends. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.
 
ISSN0388-0001
2013 Impact Factor: 0.415
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.438
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.langsci.2010.08.004
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000283704600008
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorPablé, A
 
dc.contributor.authorHaas, M
 
dc.contributor.authorChriste, N
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T05:39:47Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T05:39:47Z
 
dc.date.issued2010
 
dc.description.abstractThe concepts of 'native speaker' and 'mother tongue', which attribute to the individual one fixed underlying 'linguistic identity' (or two in the case of bilinguals), are shunned by sociocultural linguists with an interest in group identities, precisely because identities, while being linguistically constructed, are held by the ethnographer to be 'fluid' and never antecedently given. Sociolinguists working on identity within the sociocultural framework have therefore turned their back on any dialectological questions, preferring to focus on how linguistic features may contextually index a social identity as part of 'styles' (rather than 'varieties of language'). This paper critically examines the work of two American anthropologists and linguists, Mary Bucholtz and Kira Hall, from the vantage point of an integrational critique of linguistics (cf. also Pablé and Haas, 2010). The focal point of our critique is the conviction that 'identities', as first-order communicational phenomena, cannot be the object of scientific empirical research because this presupposes that indexical values are viewed as micro-contextually determined and available to outsiders with an 'insider view'. The integrationist, in turn, sees 'identity' as a metadiscursive label used by lay speakers to cope with their everyday first-order experience. For the integrationist, this is where identity research begins and ends. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationLanguage Sciences, 2010, v. 32 n. 6, p. 671-676 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.langsci.2010.08.004
 
dc.identifier.citeulike7838149
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.langsci.2010.08.004
 
dc.identifier.epage676
 
dc.identifier.hkuros170118
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000283704600008
 
dc.identifier.issn0388-0001
2013 Impact Factor: 0.415
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.438
 
dc.identifier.issue6
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77957315355
 
dc.identifier.spage671
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/65659
 
dc.identifier.volume32
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/langsci
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofLanguage Sciences
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectBucholtz, M. and Hall, K.
 
dc.subjectEthnography
 
dc.subjectHarris, R.
 
dc.subjectIntegrational linguistics
 
dc.subjectLinguistic identity
 
dc.subjectSociolinguistics
 
dc.titleLanguage and social identity: An integrationist critique
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Worcester College