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Article: Fall and response: Alan Duff's shameful autoethnography

TitleFall and response: Alan Duff's shameful autoethnography
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherPostcolonial Text. The Journal's web site is located at http://pkp.ubc.ca/pocol/index.php
Citation
Postcolonial Text, 2007, v. 3 n. 4, p. 1-17 How to Cite?
AbstractThis article reads Maori writer Alan Duff's fiction as enacting strategies responding to difficult situations in the context of the identity politics underpinning New Zealand's policy of biculturalism. Situating Duff's writing in the context of its own reception, it analyses how Duff's most provocative novel, _Both Sides of the Moon_, charts the situation of being caught between Maori and Pakeha identities so as to devise a set of responses that imaginatively transform this situation into an opportunity for cross-cultural acknowledgment. The article argues that Both Sides pursues this objective in a fictional confrontation of shame, which generates a mediating narrative that leads to the discovery of the ability to respond to the presence of strangers as the foundation of identity. It demonstrates how Duff's novel relates the persistence of unacknowledged shame to the history of cultural contact in New Zealand by engaging with the cultural inscription of the estranging gaze in the form of ethnographic writing. The article ends by suggesting that this engagement places Duff's writing in a Maori tradition of autoethnographic writing that has so far predominantly been associated with women writers.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/65637
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHeim, Oen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T05:39:37Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T05:39:37Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPostcolonial Text, 2007, v. 3 n. 4, p. 1-17en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1705-9100en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/65637-
dc.description.abstractThis article reads Maori writer Alan Duff's fiction as enacting strategies responding to difficult situations in the context of the identity politics underpinning New Zealand's policy of biculturalism. Situating Duff's writing in the context of its own reception, it analyses how Duff's most provocative novel, _Both Sides of the Moon_, charts the situation of being caught between Maori and Pakeha identities so as to devise a set of responses that imaginatively transform this situation into an opportunity for cross-cultural acknowledgment. The article argues that Both Sides pursues this objective in a fictional confrontation of shame, which generates a mediating narrative that leads to the discovery of the ability to respond to the presence of strangers as the foundation of identity. It demonstrates how Duff's novel relates the persistence of unacknowledged shame to the history of cultural contact in New Zealand by engaging with the cultural inscription of the estranging gaze in the form of ethnographic writing. The article ends by suggesting that this engagement places Duff's writing in a Maori tradition of autoethnographic writing that has so far predominantly been associated with women writers.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherPostcolonial Text. The Journal's web site is located at http://pkp.ubc.ca/pocol/index.phpen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPostcolonial Texten_HK
dc.titleFall and response: Alan Duff's shameful autoethnographyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHeim, O: oheim@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHeim, O=rp01166en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.hkuros141744en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros140800-
dc.identifier.volume3-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage1-
dc.identifier.epage17-
dc.publisher.placeCanada-

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