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Article: Race and Language: Ties of 'Blood and Speech', Fictive Identity and Empire in the Writings of Henry Maine and Edward Freeman

TitleRace and Language: Ties of 'Blood and Speech', Fictive Identity and Empire in the Writings of Henry Maine and Edward Freeman
Authors
KeywordsLinguistic Theory
Aryan, Language And The British Empire
Linguistics And Identity
Orientalism
Race Theory
Issue Date2000
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/1369801X.asp
Citation
Interventions, 2000, v. 2 n. 1, p. 53-72 How to Cite?
AbstractThis essay examines the views of two nineteenth-century intellectuals, the lawyer Sir Henry Sumner Maine (1822-88), and the historian Edward Augustus Freeman (1823-92). Both were writing at the height of Empire, in the age of the 'comparative spirit' and of the new sciences of comparative philology and comparative ethnology. Neither was a professional linguist nor a race theorist, but both responded to the rise of these new sciences by noting their great impact on European politics. New forms of identity had arisen based on a shared language or a reconstructed linguistic affinity. Maine and Freeman shared the recognition that these new identities were not strictly grounded in accepted scientific fact, and that race could not simply be equated with language. Both Maine and Freeman were concerned with the nature of the British Empire, and Freeman in particular saw a potential conflict between the new language-based identities of Europe and the future of the British Empire. For Freeman saw the ties of Empire as a threat to Britain and to its relationship with the United States within a 'Greater Britain' made up of politically independent but ideologically and linguistically kindred states. It is argued that a key to the understanding of twentieth-century identity politics can be found in the partial dislocation - perceived clearly by Freeman and Maine - of these new identities both from historical reality and from the categories of philological and ethnological science. These identities draw on the prestige of these new sciences, but they are fictive identities constructed as myth and requiring acts of social will and leadership ('the hero') to sustain them.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/65627
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 0.164
2014 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.232

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHutton, Cen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T05:39:32Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T05:39:32Z-
dc.date.issued2000en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInterventions, 2000, v. 2 n. 1, p. 53-72en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1369-801Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/65627-
dc.description.abstractThis essay examines the views of two nineteenth-century intellectuals, the lawyer Sir Henry Sumner Maine (1822-88), and the historian Edward Augustus Freeman (1823-92). Both were writing at the height of Empire, in the age of the 'comparative spirit' and of the new sciences of comparative philology and comparative ethnology. Neither was a professional linguist nor a race theorist, but both responded to the rise of these new sciences by noting their great impact on European politics. New forms of identity had arisen based on a shared language or a reconstructed linguistic affinity. Maine and Freeman shared the recognition that these new identities were not strictly grounded in accepted scientific fact, and that race could not simply be equated with language. Both Maine and Freeman were concerned with the nature of the British Empire, and Freeman in particular saw a potential conflict between the new language-based identities of Europe and the future of the British Empire. For Freeman saw the ties of Empire as a threat to Britain and to its relationship with the United States within a 'Greater Britain' made up of politically independent but ideologically and linguistically kindred states. It is argued that a key to the understanding of twentieth-century identity politics can be found in the partial dislocation - perceived clearly by Freeman and Maine - of these new identities both from historical reality and from the categories of philological and ethnological science. These identities draw on the prestige of these new sciences, but they are fictive identities constructed as myth and requiring acts of social will and leadership ('the hero') to sustain them.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/1369801X.aspen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInterventionsen_HK
dc.subjectLinguistic Theory-
dc.subjectAryan, Language And The British Empire-
dc.subjectLinguistics And Identity-
dc.subjectOrientalism-
dc.subjectRace Theory-
dc.titleRace and Language: Ties of 'Blood and Speech', Fictive Identity and Empire in the Writings of Henry Maine and Edward Freemanen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1369-801X&volume=2&spage=53&epage=72&date=2000&atitle=Race+and+Language:+Ties+of+%27Blood+and+Speech%27,+Fictive+Identity+and+Empire+in+the+Writings+of+Henry+Maine+and+Edward+Freemanen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHutton, C: chutton@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHutton, CM=rp01161en_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/136980100360797-
dc.identifier.hkuros52100en_HK
dc.identifier.volume2-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage53-
dc.identifier.epage72-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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