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Article: Response of bacterioplankton community structures to hydrological conditions and anthropogenic pollution in contrasting subtropical environments

TitleResponse of bacterioplankton community structures to hydrological conditions and anthropogenic pollution in contrasting subtropical environments
Authors
KeywordsAnthropogenic pollution
Bacterioplankton
Coastal environments
Community structure
Hydrological conditions
Issue Date2009
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0168-6496
Citation
Fems Microbiology Ecology, 2009, v. 69 n. 3, p. 449-460 How to Cite?
AbstractBacterioplankton community structures under contrasting subtropical marine environments (Hong Kong waters) were analyzed using 16S rRNA gene denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and subsequent sequencing of predominant bands for samples collected bimonthly from 2004 to 2006 at five stations. Generally, bacterial abundance was significantly higher in the summer than in the winter. The general seasonal variations of the bacterial community structure, as indicated by cluster analysis of the DGGE pattern, were best correlated with temperature at most stations, except for the station close to a sewage discharge outfall, which was best explained by pollution-indicating parameters (e.g. biochemical oxygen demand). Anthropogenic pollutions appear to have affected the presence and the intensity of DGGE bands at the stations receiving discharge of primarily treated sewage. The relative abundance of major bacterial species, calculated by the relative intensity of DGGE bands after PCR amplification, also indicated the effects of hydrological or seasonal variations and sewage discharges. For the first time, a systematic molecular fingerprinting analysis of the bacterioplankton community composition was carried out along the environmental and pollution gradient in a subtropical marine environment, and it suggests that hydrological conditions and anthropogenic pollutions altered the total bacterial community as well as the dominant bacterial groups. © 2009 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/65596
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.53
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.687
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
HKSARAoE04/04-02
Funding Information:

We would like to thank the Environmental Protection Department, Hong Kong Government, for providing environmental monitoring data and critical comments from Prof. Paul Harrison and Dr Hongbin Liu. We are grateful for the technical assistance of Tam Yin Ki, On On Lee, Ying Xu, Xiangcheng Yuan, Dongmei Li, and Bingzhang Chen. This study was funded by the HKSAR governmental grant (AoE04/04-02) to P.-Y.Q.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorLau, SCKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKi, JSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorThiyagarajan, Ven_HK
dc.contributor.authorQian, PYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-02T08:39:06Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-02T08:39:06Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationFems Microbiology Ecology, 2009, v. 69 n. 3, p. 449-460en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0168-6496en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/65596-
dc.description.abstractBacterioplankton community structures under contrasting subtropical marine environments (Hong Kong waters) were analyzed using 16S rRNA gene denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and subsequent sequencing of predominant bands for samples collected bimonthly from 2004 to 2006 at five stations. Generally, bacterial abundance was significantly higher in the summer than in the winter. The general seasonal variations of the bacterial community structure, as indicated by cluster analysis of the DGGE pattern, were best correlated with temperature at most stations, except for the station close to a sewage discharge outfall, which was best explained by pollution-indicating parameters (e.g. biochemical oxygen demand). Anthropogenic pollutions appear to have affected the presence and the intensity of DGGE bands at the stations receiving discharge of primarily treated sewage. The relative abundance of major bacterial species, calculated by the relative intensity of DGGE bands after PCR amplification, also indicated the effects of hydrological or seasonal variations and sewage discharges. For the first time, a systematic molecular fingerprinting analysis of the bacterioplankton community composition was carried out along the environmental and pollution gradient in a subtropical marine environment, and it suggests that hydrological conditions and anthropogenic pollutions altered the total bacterial community as well as the dominant bacterial groups. © 2009 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0168-6496en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofFEMS Microbiology Ecologyen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectAnthropogenic pollutionen_HK
dc.subjectBacterioplanktonen_HK
dc.subjectCoastal environmentsen_HK
dc.subjectCommunity structureen_HK
dc.subjectHydrological conditionsen_HK
dc.subject.meshBacteria - classification - genetics - growth and development - isolation and purification-
dc.subject.meshDNA, Bacterial - genetics-
dc.subject.meshEnvironmental Monitoring-
dc.subject.meshWater Microbiology-
dc.subject.meshWater Pollution, Chemical-
dc.titleResponse of bacterioplankton community structures to hydrological conditions and anthropogenic pollution in contrasting subtropical environmentsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0168-6496&volume=69&issue=3&spage=449&epage=460&date=2009&atitle=Response+of+bacterioplankton+community+structures+to+hydrological+conditions+and+anthropogenic+pollution+in+contrasting+subtropical+environments-
dc.identifier.emailThiyagarajan, V: rajan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityThiyagarajan, V=rp00796en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1574-6941.2009.00726.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19619230-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-68249132071en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros161451-
dc.identifier.hkuros161404-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-68249132071&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume69en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage449en_HK
dc.identifier.epage460en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000268655100012-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, R=7404865691en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, SCK=8646306200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKi, JS=8506090900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThiyagarajan, V=6602476830en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridQian, PY=35240648600en_HK

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