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Article: Beneficial effects of cinnamon proanthocyanidins on the formation of specific advanced glycation endproducts and methylglyoxal-induced impairment on glucose consumption
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TitleBeneficial effects of cinnamon proanthocyanidins on the formation of specific advanced glycation endproducts and methylglyoxal-induced impairment on glucose consumption
 
AuthorsPeng, X1
Ma, J1
Chao, J1
Sun, Z1
Chang, RCC1
Tse, I1
Li, ETS1
Chen, F1
Wang, M1
 
KeywordsCinnamon bark
Insulin signaling
MGO
N ε- (carboxymethyl)lysine (CML)
Pentosidine
Proanthocyanidin
 
Issue Date2010
 
PublisherAmerican Chemical Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://pubs.acs.org/journal/jafcau
 
CitationJournal Of Agricultural And Food Chemistry, 2010, v. 58 n. 11, p. 6692-6696 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf100538t
 
AbstractAdvanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) are a group of complex and heterogeneous compounds formed from nonenzymatic reactions. The accumulation of AGEs in vivo has been implicated as a major pathogenic process in diabetic complications and other health disorders, such as atherosclerosis and Alzheimerâs disease, and normal aging. In this study, we investigate the inhibitory effects of cinnamon bark proanthocyanidins, catechin, epicatechin, and procyanidin B2 on the formation of specific AGE representatives including pentosidine, N ε-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML), and methylglyoxal (MGO) derived AGEs. These compounds displayed obvious inhibitory effects on these specific AGEs, which are largely attributed to both their antioxidant activities and carbonyl scavenging capacities. Meanwhile, in terms of their potent MGO scavenging capacities, effects of these proanthocyanidins on insulin signaling pathways interfered by MGO were evaluated in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. According to the results, proanthocyanidins exerted protective effects on glucose consumption impaired by MGO in 3T3-L1 fat cells. © 2010 American Chemical Society.
 
ISSN0021-8561
2013 Impact Factor: 3.107
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.428
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf100538t
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000278149500022
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorPeng, X
 
dc.contributor.authorMa, J
 
dc.contributor.authorChao, J
 
dc.contributor.authorSun, Z
 
dc.contributor.authorChang, RCC
 
dc.contributor.authorTse, I
 
dc.contributor.authorLi, ETS
 
dc.contributor.authorChen, F
 
dc.contributor.authorWang, M
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-09T07:23:38Z
 
dc.date.available2010-08-09T07:23:38Z
 
dc.date.issued2010
 
dc.description.abstractAdvanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) are a group of complex and heterogeneous compounds formed from nonenzymatic reactions. The accumulation of AGEs in vivo has been implicated as a major pathogenic process in diabetic complications and other health disorders, such as atherosclerosis and Alzheimerâs disease, and normal aging. In this study, we investigate the inhibitory effects of cinnamon bark proanthocyanidins, catechin, epicatechin, and procyanidin B2 on the formation of specific AGE representatives including pentosidine, N ε-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML), and methylglyoxal (MGO) derived AGEs. These compounds displayed obvious inhibitory effects on these specific AGEs, which are largely attributed to both their antioxidant activities and carbonyl scavenging capacities. Meanwhile, in terms of their potent MGO scavenging capacities, effects of these proanthocyanidins on insulin signaling pathways interfered by MGO were evaluated in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. According to the results, proanthocyanidins exerted protective effects on glucose consumption impaired by MGO in 3T3-L1 fat cells. © 2010 American Chemical Society.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Agricultural And Food Chemistry, 2010, v. 58 n. 11, p. 6692-6696 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf100538t
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf100538t
 
dc.identifier.eissn1520-5118
 
dc.identifier.epage6696
 
dc.identifier.hkuros170843
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000278149500022
 
dc.identifier.issn0021-8561
2013 Impact Factor: 3.107
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.428
 
dc.identifier.issue11
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid20476737
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77953155163
 
dc.identifier.spage6692
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/65459
 
dc.identifier.volume58
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://pubs.acs.org/journal/jafcau
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectCinnamon bark
 
dc.subjectInsulin signaling
 
dc.subjectMGO
 
dc.subjectN ε- (carboxymethyl)lysine (CML)
 
dc.subjectPentosidine
 
dc.subjectProanthocyanidin
 
dc.titleBeneficial effects of cinnamon proanthocyanidins on the formation of specific advanced glycation endproducts and methylglyoxal-induced impairment on glucose consumption
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine