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Article: A frolic in the law of tort: expanding the scope of employers' vicarious liability
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TitleA frolic in the law of tort: expanding the scope of employers' vicarious liability
 
AuthorsGlofcheski, R
 
KeywordsLaw - Civil Law
 
Issue Date2004
 
PublisherLawbook Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlineecom01.thomson.com.au/thomson/Catalog.asp?EES_CMD=SI&EES_ID=100472
 
CitationTort Law Review, 2004, v. 12, p. 18-39 [How to Cite?]
 
AbstractThe traditional approach to the imposition of employers' vicarious liability has recently been reconsidered and revised by the Supreme Court of Canada and the House of Lords, in the context of employees' sexual assaults committed against young persons in their charge. Under the new, more flexible approach, vicarious liability can be imposed on the basis of a close connection between the employment and the tort. This change is more than cosmetic. It is no longer necessary to show that the employee's wrongful act was a mode of carrying out the employment duties. This article reviews the case law in which this development has taken place, and considers the appropriateness of the close connection principle to cases of negligence-based torts.
 
ISSN1039-3285
 
SSRN1815884
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorGlofcheski, R
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-03T08:06:29Z
 
dc.date.available2010-08-03T08:06:29Z
 
dc.date.issued2004
 
dc.description.abstractThe traditional approach to the imposition of employers' vicarious liability has recently been reconsidered and revised by the Supreme Court of Canada and the House of Lords, in the context of employees' sexual assaults committed against young persons in their charge. Under the new, more flexible approach, vicarious liability can be imposed on the basis of a close connection between the employment and the tort. This change is more than cosmetic. It is no longer necessary to show that the employee's wrongful act was a mode of carrying out the employment duties. This article reviews the case law in which this development has taken place, and considers the appropriateness of the close connection principle to cases of negligence-based torts.
 
dc.description.naturepostprint
 
dc.identifier.citationTort Law Review, 2004, v. 12, p. 18-39 [How to Cite?]
 
dc.identifier.epage39
 
dc.identifier.hkuros88716
 
dc.identifier.issn1039-3285
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.spage18
 
dc.identifier.ssrn1815884
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/65433
 
dc.identifier.volume12
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherLawbook Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlineecom01.thomson.com.au/thomson/Catalog.asp?EES_CMD=SI&EES_ID=100472
 
dc.relation.ispartofTort Law Review
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.subjectLaw - Civil Law
 
dc.titleA frolic in the law of tort: expanding the scope of employers' vicarious liability
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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