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Conference Paper: Women in the Colonial Archives

TitleWomen in the Colonial Archives
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherSchool of English, The University of Hong Kong.
Citation
The 2009 Symposium on Postcolonial Collections and Archives, Hong Kong, 4-6 June 2009. In Conference Abstracts, 2009, p. 9 How to Cite?
AbstractWriting about the history of women in the 19th century, the French historian Alain Corbin remarks: “Women’s history is like an echo, perceived with the help of a whole range of male data, despite the efforts of historians (both male and female) to seek out women’s words more directly, Almost all the documents in the public archives were written by men in positions of responsibilities.”1 Such is certainly the case of French colonial history, which until recently has been dominated by an almost exclusively male cast. In this paper, I discuss some of the challenges I encounter in my own research on the lives of French women in Indochina in the early decades of the 20th century. One major issue has to do with the politics of selecting and cataloguing sources in the archives, which is heavily gender and class inflected. The second challenge lies in the reading and interpretation of the archival sources on and by women.
DescriptionTheme: Where Are We Now?
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/64978

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHa, MPen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-13T05:07:17Z-
dc.date.available2010-07-13T05:07:17Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe 2009 Symposium on Postcolonial Collections and Archives, Hong Kong, 4-6 June 2009. In Conference Abstracts, 2009, p. 9en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/64978-
dc.descriptionTheme: Where Are We Now?en_HK
dc.description.abstractWriting about the history of women in the 19th century, the French historian Alain Corbin remarks: “Women’s history is like an echo, perceived with the help of a whole range of male data, despite the efforts of historians (both male and female) to seek out women’s words more directly, Almost all the documents in the public archives were written by men in positions of responsibilities.”1 Such is certainly the case of French colonial history, which until recently has been dominated by an almost exclusively male cast. In this paper, I discuss some of the challenges I encounter in my own research on the lives of French women in Indochina in the early decades of the 20th century. One major issue has to do with the politics of selecting and cataloguing sources in the archives, which is heavily gender and class inflected. The second challenge lies in the reading and interpretation of the archival sources on and by women.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSchool of English, The University of Hong Kong.-
dc.relation.ispartofSymposium on Postcolonial Collections and Archives-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleWomen in the Colonial Archivesen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHa, MP: moyha@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHa, MP=rp01192en_HK
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.hkuros164505en_HK
dc.identifier.spage9-
dc.identifier.epage9-
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong-

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