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Conference Paper: Money, desire and citizenship: negotiating urban citizenship among rural-to-urban migrant male sex workers in China

TitleMoney, desire and citizenship: negotiating urban citizenship among rural-to-urban migrant male sex workers in China
Authors
Issue Date2009
Citation
The 7th Conference of the International Association for the Study of Sexuality, Culture and Society (IASSCS 2009), Hanoi, Vietnam, 15-18 April 2009. How to Cite?
AbstractAs part of a massive rural-to-urban migrant population of more than 100 million in contemporary China, rural male migrants in their early twenties are increasingly joining the sex industry, offering sexual services to other men. This paper seeks to understand how these male sex workers (in the local parlance, ''money boys'') suffer from multiple levels of discrimination and stigmatization both from society at large and the gay community in particular. In-depth semi-structured face-to-face interviews were conducted in Beijing and Shanghai, China. Informants were recruited through referral from an NGO with a strong men who have sex with men (MSM) network, and using snowball technique. Between 2004 and 2005, thirty ''money boys'' were interviewed (Beijing, n514; Shanghai, n516). Respondents were mainly single, young, homo-sexual, rural migrants with a secondary education. They employed various strategies - conforming, performing, rejecting, escaping - in handling three major interlocking stigmatized identities: rural migrants, sex workers and MSM. They struggle under a ''hierarchy of citizenship'' along the lines of class, work, gender, sexuality, origin of birth, etc., in order to survive. By viewing their coping strategies as a citizenship-making process, this paper argues that they negotiate a notion of identity under the confines of the dominant ideal of urban citizenship. This paper thus contributes to recent debates on citizenship by enhancing our understanding of a neglected group in cities, whose marginality does not fit within the dominant ideal of (urban) citizenship.
DescriptionSession on Migrant Sex Workers and Trafficked Persons into Forced Prostitution: Unique Challenges Facing Diverse Populations
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/63940

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKong, Ten_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-13T04:36:20Z-
dc.date.available2010-07-13T04:36:20Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe 7th Conference of the International Association for the Study of Sexuality, Culture and Society (IASSCS 2009), Hanoi, Vietnam, 15-18 April 2009.-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/63940-
dc.descriptionSession on Migrant Sex Workers and Trafficked Persons into Forced Prostitution: Unique Challenges Facing Diverse Populationsen_HK
dc.description.abstractAs part of a massive rural-to-urban migrant population of more than 100 million in contemporary China, rural male migrants in their early twenties are increasingly joining the sex industry, offering sexual services to other men. This paper seeks to understand how these male sex workers (in the local parlance, ''money boys'') suffer from multiple levels of discrimination and stigmatization both from society at large and the gay community in particular. In-depth semi-structured face-to-face interviews were conducted in Beijing and Shanghai, China. Informants were recruited through referral from an NGO with a strong men who have sex with men (MSM) network, and using snowball technique. Between 2004 and 2005, thirty ''money boys'' were interviewed (Beijing, n514; Shanghai, n516). Respondents were mainly single, young, homo-sexual, rural migrants with a secondary education. They employed various strategies - conforming, performing, rejecting, escaping - in handling three major interlocking stigmatized identities: rural migrants, sex workers and MSM. They struggle under a ''hierarchy of citizenship'' along the lines of class, work, gender, sexuality, origin of birth, etc., in order to survive. By viewing their coping strategies as a citizenship-making process, this paper argues that they negotiate a notion of identity under the confines of the dominant ideal of urban citizenship. This paper thus contributes to recent debates on citizenship by enhancing our understanding of a neglected group in cities, whose marginality does not fit within the dominant ideal of (urban) citizenship.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofConference of the International Association for the Study of Sexuality, Culture and Society-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleMoney, desire and citizenship: negotiating urban citizenship among rural-to-urban migrant male sex workers in Chinaen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailKong, T: travisk@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.hkuros163134en_HK
dc.description.otherThe 7th Conference of the International Association for the Study of Sexuality, Culture and Society (IASSCS 2009), Hanoi, Vietnam, 15-18 April 2009.-

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