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Conference Paper: Cheap Labour Reserves & the Growth of Cities: Undocumented Indonesian Workers in Macau

TitleCheap Labour Reserves & the Growth of Cities: Undocumented Indonesian Workers in Macau
Other TitlesUndocumented Indonesian Workers in Macau: the Human Outcome of Colluding Interests
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherUniversity of Leeds.
Citation
International Workshop on Gender, Migrant Workers and Citizenship in Greater Mekong Subregion: Economic and Political Perspectives for a World in Crisis, Asian Institute of Technology Conference Center, Thailand, 1-3 June 2009. In Proceedings: International Workshop on Gender, Migrant Workers and Citizenship in Greater Mekong Subregion: Economic and Political Perspectives for a World in Crisis, p. 30-31 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper presents new research findings on undocumented Indonesian migrant workers in Macau, about whom no previous study exists. Critical analysis explicates the dovetailing arrangements between public and private sector interests that are systemically creating undocumented labour migration flows and shows how these arrangements are structurally inherent in the mutual competitiveness of globalising nodes of wealth creation. Undocumented migration cheapens production costs and results in a flexible black market of vulnerable, right-less and exploited workers. Contrary to illusions of an urbanizing Asia with expanding spaces for civil liberties, the development of globally competitive mega-cities, built and supported by low-skilled migrant workers, rests on a global underclass of transient workers, who bear the human costs of transience and labour flexibility, enabling mega-cities to externalise such costs and enhancing their global competitiveness. In this paper we analyse the vulnerabilities of undocumented Indonesian workers in the context of Macau‘s rapid economic development as an aspiring mega-city. The Macau government‘s laissezfaire tolerance of such workers is grounded in the need for a particular type of human labour, that is abundant, cheap, marginal and disposable, fuelling rapid growth. Furthermore, the outflow of Indonesian migrant workers to Macau is linked to Hong Kong‘s exclusionary Immigration policies, which aim at extricating surplus migrant labour. Meanwhile, the Indonesian government refuses responsibility for its migrant workers in Macau on the grounds that Macau is not recognised as an official destination, thereby denying its own role as a structural producer of such labour. The paper shows how public and private interests motivate increasing numbers of migrants to become undocumented overstayers in Macau, as they try to avoid oppressive practices in labour migration from Indonesia and the exclusionary policies of Hong Kong.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/63934

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSim, ASCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWee, V-
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-13T04:36:13Z-
dc.date.available2010-07-13T04:36:13Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Workshop on Gender, Migrant Workers and Citizenship in Greater Mekong Subregion: Economic and Political Perspectives for a World in Crisis, Asian Institute of Technology Conference Center, Thailand, 1-3 June 2009. In Proceedings: International Workshop on Gender, Migrant Workers and Citizenship in Greater Mekong Subregion: Economic and Political Perspectives for a World in Crisis, p. 30-31-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/63934-
dc.description.abstractThis paper presents new research findings on undocumented Indonesian migrant workers in Macau, about whom no previous study exists. Critical analysis explicates the dovetailing arrangements between public and private sector interests that are systemically creating undocumented labour migration flows and shows how these arrangements are structurally inherent in the mutual competitiveness of globalising nodes of wealth creation. Undocumented migration cheapens production costs and results in a flexible black market of vulnerable, right-less and exploited workers. Contrary to illusions of an urbanizing Asia with expanding spaces for civil liberties, the development of globally competitive mega-cities, built and supported by low-skilled migrant workers, rests on a global underclass of transient workers, who bear the human costs of transience and labour flexibility, enabling mega-cities to externalise such costs and enhancing their global competitiveness. In this paper we analyse the vulnerabilities of undocumented Indonesian workers in the context of Macau‘s rapid economic development as an aspiring mega-city. The Macau government‘s laissezfaire tolerance of such workers is grounded in the need for a particular type of human labour, that is abundant, cheap, marginal and disposable, fuelling rapid growth. Furthermore, the outflow of Indonesian migrant workers to Macau is linked to Hong Kong‘s exclusionary Immigration policies, which aim at extricating surplus migrant labour. Meanwhile, the Indonesian government refuses responsibility for its migrant workers in Macau on the grounds that Macau is not recognised as an official destination, thereby denying its own role as a structural producer of such labour. The paper shows how public and private interests motivate increasing numbers of migrants to become undocumented overstayers in Macau, as they try to avoid oppressive practices in labour migration from Indonesia and the exclusionary policies of Hong Kong.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherUniversity of Leeds.-
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings: International Workshop on Gender, Migrant Workers and Citizenship in Greater Mekong Subregion: Economic and Political Perspectives for a World in Crisis-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleCheap Labour Reserves & the Growth of Cities: Undocumented Indonesian Workers in Macauen_HK
dc.title.alternativeUndocumented Indonesian Workers in Macau: the Human Outcome of Colluding Interests-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailSim, ASC: asim@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySim, ASC=rp00620en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.hkuros163581en_HK
dc.identifier.spage30-
dc.identifier.epage31-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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