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Conference Paper: Increasing difficulty but not decreasing performance: maintained interception with increments in visual blur
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TitleIncreasing difficulty but not decreasing performance: maintained interception with increments in visual blur
 
AuthorsMann, DL
Abernethy, B
Farrow, D
 
Issue Date2009
 
CitationThe ISSP 12th World Congress of Sport Psychology, Marrakesh, Morocco, 17-21 June 2009. [How to Cite?]
 
AbstractINTRODUCTION: In an earlier study on the relationship between visual blur and interceptive skill (Mann, Ho, De Souza, Watson, & Taylor, 2007) it was observed that interceptive performance can be maintained despite the introduction of significant refractive visual blur. Mann et al. found that contact lenses simulating legally-blind levels of short-sightedness were required (6/60 or 20/200 acuity) before any subjectively assessed decrease in skilled performance could be measured when intercepting balls pitched by a projection machine in the sport of cricket. Several of the participants reported a preference for taking part with low levels of visual blur as a means of focusing concentration and visual attention, raising the possibility that rather than decreasing performance, training with blurred vision may provide an opportunity to enhance skill acquisition. The aim of this study was to extend the protocol of Mann et …
 
DescriptionConference Theme: Meeting New Challenges and Bridging Cultural Gaps in Sport and Exercise Psychology
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorMann, DL
 
dc.contributor.authorAbernethy, B
 
dc.contributor.authorFarrow, D
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-13T04:35:03Z
 
dc.date.available2010-07-13T04:35:03Z
 
dc.date.issued2009
 
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION: In an earlier study on the relationship between visual blur and interceptive skill (Mann, Ho, De Souza, Watson, & Taylor, 2007) it was observed that interceptive performance can be maintained despite the introduction of significant refractive visual blur. Mann et al. found that contact lenses simulating legally-blind levels of short-sightedness were required (6/60 or 20/200 acuity) before any subjectively assessed decrease in skilled performance could be measured when intercepting balls pitched by a projection machine in the sport of cricket. Several of the participants reported a preference for taking part with low levels of visual blur as a means of focusing concentration and visual attention, raising the possibility that rather than decreasing performance, training with blurred vision may provide an opportunity to enhance skill acquisition. The aim of this study was to extend the protocol of Mann et …
 
dc.description.naturepostprint
 
dc.descriptionConference Theme: Meeting New Challenges and Bridging Cultural Gaps in Sport and Exercise Psychology
 
dc.identifier.citationThe ISSP 12th World Congress of Sport Psychology, Marrakesh, Morocco, 17-21 June 2009. [How to Cite?]
 
dc.identifier.hkuros166997
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/63900
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of the 12th World Congress of Sport Psychology
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.titleIncreasing difficulty but not decreasing performance: maintained interception with increments in visual blur
 
dc.typeConference_Paper
 
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<description.abstract>INTRODUCTION: In an earlier study on the relationship between visual blur and interceptive skill (Mann, Ho, De Souza, Watson, &amp; Taylor, 2007) it was observed that interceptive performance can be maintained despite the introduction of significant refractive visual blur. Mann et al. found that contact lenses simulating legally-blind levels of short-sightedness were required (6/60 or 20/200 acuity) before any subjectively assessed decrease in skilled performance could be measured when intercepting balls pitched by a projection machine in the sport of cricket. Several of the participants reported a preference for taking part with low levels of visual blur as a means of focusing concentration and visual attention, raising the possibility that rather than decreasing performance, training with blurred vision may provide an opportunity to enhance skill acquisition. The aim of this study was to extend the protocol of Mann et &#8230;</description.abstract>
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