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Conference Paper: Skilled anticipation relies on the coupling of vision with action

TitleSkilled anticipation relies on the coupling of vision with action
Authors
KeywordsMedical sciences
Ophthalmology and optometry
Issue Date2009
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.optometrists.asn.au/ceo
Citation
The 12th Biennial Scientific Meeting and 6th Educators Meeting in Optometry, Auckland, New Zealand, 28–30 September 2008.Clinical and Experimental Optometry, 2009, v. 92 n. 1, p. 61 How to Cite?
AbstractPURPOSE: Skilled performers in time-stressed sports learn to use kinematic information resultant from body movements to overcome the high-speed constraints inherent in such tasks. Traditional tests rely on verbal responses or representative movements, failing to truly represent the perception-action (PA) coupling inherent in performance. The aim of this study is to examine whether systematic increases in the coupling between vision and action elicit changes in anticipatory skill. METHODS: Twelve skilled and 11 novice cricket batters predicted the direction of balls bowled towards them. Four counterbalanced conditions of increasing PA coupling were used; a verbal response, a lower-body only representative movement, a whole body (with no bat) representative movement and a full-body (with bat) movement condition. To test anticipatory skill, participants wore PLATO liquid crystal goggles that on selected deliveries occluded vision when the bowler released the ball. Participants verbalised, moved towards or attempted to hit the ball; with the percentage of correct predictions in ball direction (forced choice ‘off’ or ‘leg’ side) representing anticipatory skill. RESULTS: A significant interaction occurred between PA coupling and skill for deliveries occluded at ball release (F[3,63] = 4.35, p < 0.01). Skilled batters significantly improved anticipatory skill from the verbal to lower-body representative movement (p < 0.05) and from full-body representative to the full-body with bat condition (p < 0.05). Novices responded at chance levels across all four conditions. CONCLUSIONS: Coupling between perception and action is essential when looking to examine anticipatory skill in time-stressed tasks. The expectation of interception may be an important factor in truly engaging the visual-motor system, on which skilled performers rely in interceptive tasks.
DescriptionSession - Vision Science In Clinical Practice
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/63885
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.28
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.633
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMann, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorAbernethy, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorFarrow, Den_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-13T04:34:43Z-
dc.date.available2010-07-13T04:34:43Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe 12th Biennial Scientific Meeting and 6th Educators Meeting in Optometry, Auckland, New Zealand, 28–30 September 2008.Clinical and Experimental Optometry, 2009, v. 92 n. 1, p. 61-
dc.identifier.issn0816-4622-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/63885-
dc.descriptionSession - Vision Science In Clinical Practiceen_HK
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Skilled performers in time-stressed sports learn to use kinematic information resultant from body movements to overcome the high-speed constraints inherent in such tasks. Traditional tests rely on verbal responses or representative movements, failing to truly represent the perception-action (PA) coupling inherent in performance. The aim of this study is to examine whether systematic increases in the coupling between vision and action elicit changes in anticipatory skill. METHODS: Twelve skilled and 11 novice cricket batters predicted the direction of balls bowled towards them. Four counterbalanced conditions of increasing PA coupling were used; a verbal response, a lower-body only representative movement, a whole body (with no bat) representative movement and a full-body (with bat) movement condition. To test anticipatory skill, participants wore PLATO liquid crystal goggles that on selected deliveries occluded vision when the bowler released the ball. Participants verbalised, moved towards or attempted to hit the ball; with the percentage of correct predictions in ball direction (forced choice ‘off’ or ‘leg’ side) representing anticipatory skill. RESULTS: A significant interaction occurred between PA coupling and skill for deliveries occluded at ball release (F[3,63] = 4.35, p < 0.01). Skilled batters significantly improved anticipatory skill from the verbal to lower-body representative movement (p < 0.05) and from full-body representative to the full-body with bat condition (p < 0.05). Novices responded at chance levels across all four conditions. CONCLUSIONS: Coupling between perception and action is essential when looking to examine anticipatory skill in time-stressed tasks. The expectation of interception may be an important factor in truly engaging the visual-motor system, on which skilled performers rely in interceptive tasks.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.optometrists.asn.au/ceo-
dc.relation.ispartofClinical and Experimental Optometry-
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com-
dc.subjectMedical sciences-
dc.subjectOphthalmology and optometry-
dc.titleSkilled anticipation relies on the coupling of vision with actionen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailMann, D: dmann@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailAbernethy, B: bruceab@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityMann, D=rp01492en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1444-0938.2008.00341.x-
dc.identifier.hkuros166640en_HK
dc.identifier.volume92-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage61-
dc.identifier.epage61-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000262105600012-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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