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Conference Paper: Knowledge sources and MNC subsidiary roles

TitleKnowledge sources and MNC subsidiary roles
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherAcademy of International Business. The Journal's web site is located at http://aib.msu.edu/publications/confproceed.asp
Citation
The 51st Annual Meeting of the Academy of International Business (AIB 2009), San Diego, CA., 27-30 June 2009. In Academy of International Business Annual Meeting Proceedings, 2009, p. 103 How to Cite?
AbstractIn order to improve our understanding of the roles that subsidiaries play in the knowledge generation and innovation processes, the present study draws together the literature on knowledge sources and subsidiary mandates to develop a series of hypotheses about where the subsidiary obtains the knowledge that it deploys, and how this is linked to the roles and functions that the subsidiary performs for the corporation as a whole. We report the results of a series of empirical tests of these relationships, using data from a survey of the subsidiaries of foreign firms in Singapore. The results indicate, as postulated, that different subsidiary roles of implementation, innovation for the local market, and innovation for international markets do indeed have different patterns of significant relationships when it comes to knowledge sources. Counter to expectation, however, sister subsidiaries do not show up as significant sources of knowledge for either implementation or innovation roles, casting doubt on whether MNCs in practice behave as “networked” knowledge system with direct knowledge flows between multiple subsidiaries. We conclude with a discussion of the implications of our findings for managers, policy makers and for further research. (For more information, please contact: Peter James Williamson, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom: p.williamson@jbs.cam.ac.uk)
DescriptionConference Theme: Is the World Flat or Spiky? Implications for International Business
Session 2.2.7 - Competitive
Track: 6 - Learning, Knowledge and Innovation
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/63277
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorEnright, MJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorVenkata Subban, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWilliamson, PJen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-13T04:20:07Z-
dc.date.available2010-07-13T04:20:07Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe 51st Annual Meeting of the Academy of International Business (AIB 2009), San Diego, CA., 27-30 June 2009. In Academy of International Business Annual Meeting Proceedings, 2009, p. 103-
dc.identifier.issn2078-0435-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/63277-
dc.descriptionConference Theme: Is the World Flat or Spiky? Implications for International Businessen_HK
dc.descriptionSession 2.2.7 - Competitive-
dc.descriptionTrack: 6 - Learning, Knowledge and Innovation-
dc.description.abstractIn order to improve our understanding of the roles that subsidiaries play in the knowledge generation and innovation processes, the present study draws together the literature on knowledge sources and subsidiary mandates to develop a series of hypotheses about where the subsidiary obtains the knowledge that it deploys, and how this is linked to the roles and functions that the subsidiary performs for the corporation as a whole. We report the results of a series of empirical tests of these relationships, using data from a survey of the subsidiaries of foreign firms in Singapore. The results indicate, as postulated, that different subsidiary roles of implementation, innovation for the local market, and innovation for international markets do indeed have different patterns of significant relationships when it comes to knowledge sources. Counter to expectation, however, sister subsidiaries do not show up as significant sources of knowledge for either implementation or innovation roles, casting doubt on whether MNCs in practice behave as “networked” knowledge system with direct knowledge flows between multiple subsidiaries. We conclude with a discussion of the implications of our findings for managers, policy makers and for further research. (For more information, please contact: Peter James Williamson, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom: p.williamson@jbs.cam.ac.uk)-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAcademy of International Business. The Journal's web site is located at http://aib.msu.edu/publications/confproceed.asp-
dc.relation.ispartofAcademy of International Business Annual Meeting Proceedings-
dc.titleKnowledge sources and MNC subsidiary rolesen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailEnright, MJ: mjenrigh@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailVenkata Subban, S: vsubrama@business.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityEnright, MJ=rp01059en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityVenkata Subban, S=rp01103en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.hkuros167576en_HK
dc.identifier.spage103-
dc.identifier.epage103-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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