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Conference Paper: Are intelligence and memory good endophenotypes for schizophrenia? Genetic models in a harvard, IOP, and NIH collaboration

TitleAre intelligence and memory good endophenotypes for schizophrenia? Genetic models in a harvard, IOP, and NIH collaboration
Authors
Issue Date2009
Citation
The 12th International Congress on Schizophrenia Research, San Diego, CA., 28 March-1 April 2009. In Schizophrenia Bulletin, 2009, v. 35 suppl 1, p. 110-110 How to Cite?
AbstractContext: Impairments in verbal and visual memory, verbal learning and intelligence are among the most promising indicators of increased risk for schizophrenia making them candidate endophenotypes; however it is not clear to what extent these deficits are genetically linked to the disorder. Objective: To quantify the net genetic relationship between episodic memory, learning, intelligence and schizophrenia in a large multi-site data. Design: Family and twin study. Setting: US and UK Research Institutes. Participants: Data from 2057 individuals were pooled across three sites: 1) Harvard University,USA (2) Institute of Psychiatry,UK and (3) National Institute of Health,USA. Of these individuals 657 were patients, 674 1st degree relatives and 726 were controls. Main outcome measures: The heritabilities of memory, learning and intelligence were estimated and the genetic relationship between each one of these and schizophrenia quantified. Results: Genetic influences contributed to all cognitive domains with intelligence showing the highest heritability (h2 = 0.69) and immediate recall of verbal memory the least (h2 = 0.30). Significant genetic correlations were found between schizophrenia and 1) immediate (I)/delayed (D) verbal recall (I: 0.96; D: 0.94); 2) I/D verbal learning (I: 0.47; D: 0.30) and 3) I/D visual recall (I: 0.62; D: 0.68) suggesting that schizophrenia and these measures share to some extent the same genes. When the heritabilities of these measures were taken into account, intelligence showed the biggest phenotypic correlation with schizophrenia ( .49) with shared genetic influences explaining chiefly the phenotypic co-variance. Conclusion: Unlike molecular genetic approaches which estimate the extent to which allelic variation explains endophenotypic variance, genetic modeling quantifies the net shared genetic influences between the candidate endophenotype and the illness, giving a broader view of the degree of genetic overlap between the two. Supporting our previous work in twins (Toulopoulou et al. 2007) intelligence appears to be the best endophenotype for schizophrenia sharing the greatest genetic variance with the illness. Genome wide searches using a bivariate phenotype such as schizophrenia and intelligence should assist in the search to find quantitative trait loci for schizophrenia.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/62700
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 7.757
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.051
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorToulopoulou, Ten_HK
dc.contributor.authorGoldberg, Ten_HK
dc.contributor.authorWeinberger, DRen_HK
dc.contributor.authorRijsdijk, Fen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFaraone, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTsuang, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorStahl, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorPicchioni, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorSham, PCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCherny, SSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorSeidman, Len_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-13T04:07:11Z-
dc.date.available2010-07-13T04:07:11Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe 12th International Congress on Schizophrenia Research, San Diego, CA., 28 March-1 April 2009. In Schizophrenia Bulletin, 2009, v. 35 suppl 1, p. 110-110en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0586-7614-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/62700-
dc.description.abstractContext: Impairments in verbal and visual memory, verbal learning and intelligence are among the most promising indicators of increased risk for schizophrenia making them candidate endophenotypes; however it is not clear to what extent these deficits are genetically linked to the disorder. Objective: To quantify the net genetic relationship between episodic memory, learning, intelligence and schizophrenia in a large multi-site data. Design: Family and twin study. Setting: US and UK Research Institutes. Participants: Data from 2057 individuals were pooled across three sites: 1) Harvard University,USA (2) Institute of Psychiatry,UK and (3) National Institute of Health,USA. Of these individuals 657 were patients, 674 1st degree relatives and 726 were controls. Main outcome measures: The heritabilities of memory, learning and intelligence were estimated and the genetic relationship between each one of these and schizophrenia quantified. Results: Genetic influences contributed to all cognitive domains with intelligence showing the highest heritability (h2 = 0.69) and immediate recall of verbal memory the least (h2 = 0.30). Significant genetic correlations were found between schizophrenia and 1) immediate (I)/delayed (D) verbal recall (I: 0.96; D: 0.94); 2) I/D verbal learning (I: 0.47; D: 0.30) and 3) I/D visual recall (I: 0.62; D: 0.68) suggesting that schizophrenia and these measures share to some extent the same genes. When the heritabilities of these measures were taken into account, intelligence showed the biggest phenotypic correlation with schizophrenia ( .49) with shared genetic influences explaining chiefly the phenotypic co-variance. Conclusion: Unlike molecular genetic approaches which estimate the extent to which allelic variation explains endophenotypic variance, genetic modeling quantifies the net shared genetic influences between the candidate endophenotype and the illness, giving a broader view of the degree of genetic overlap between the two. Supporting our previous work in twins (Toulopoulou et al. 2007) intelligence appears to be the best endophenotype for schizophrenia sharing the greatest genetic variance with the illness. Genome wide searches using a bivariate phenotype such as schizophrenia and intelligence should assist in the search to find quantitative trait loci for schizophrenia.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofSchizophrenia Bulletin-
dc.titleAre intelligence and memory good endophenotypes for schizophrenia? Genetic models in a harvard, IOP, and NIH collaborationen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSham, PC: pcsham@HKUCC.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailCherny, SS: cherny@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySham, PC=rp00459en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCherny, SS=rp00232en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/schbul/sbn173-
dc.identifier.pmid19252181-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2651108-
dc.identifier.hkuros158189en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000263964700003-

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