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Conference Paper: Helicobacter pylori eradication in the prevention of gastric cancer

TitleHelicobacter pylori eradication in the prevention of gastric cancer
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherInternational Institute of Anticancer Research
Citation
8th International Conference of Anticancer Research, Kos, Greece, 17-22 October 2008. In Anticancer Research, 2008, v. 28 n. 5C, p. 3543 Abstract no. 731 How to Cite?
AbstractGastric cancer remains one of the top cancer killers in the World. Chronic Helicobacter pylori infection increases the risk of gastric cancer, by stepwise progression from chronic active gastritis to gastric atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia and finally cancer. These stepwise progressions may take many years, and at present there is no proven effective treatment for the presence of premalignant lesions including intestinal metaplasia or dysplasia. Hence the two prevailing questions in gastric cancer prevention are (a) whether treatment of H. pylori-related gastritis can reduce the risk of gastric cancer, and (b) whether treatment of H. pylori-related IM or dysplasia can both reverse the premalignant lesions and reduce the risk of gastric cancer. Our randomized placebo controlled trial in China started in year 1994 included both patients with H. pylori related gastritis and patients with H. pylori related premalignant lesions (1). After 7.5 years of follow up, patients receiving H. pylori treatment showed a non-significant trend of having less gastric cancer than those patients that received placebo. The sub-group analysis showed that patients with H. pylori related gastritis benefited most from treatment, with no cancer developing in 7.5 years. However, in patients with H. pylori related premalignant lesions, there was no difference in the risk of gastric cancer in both treatment and placebo groups. Hence our study suggests that the benefit of treating H. pylori in cancer prevention may be restricted to patients with gastritis only. Correa et al. performed another randomized placebo controlled trial in Columbia which included mainly patients with H. pylori- related premalignant lesions (2). Their 12- year follow up result suggested that subjects who were H. pylori negative after treatment had 14.8% more regression and 13.7% less progression than patients who were positive at 12 years (p=0.001). Hence he concludes that it is beneficial to treat H. pylori in patients with premalignant lesions. However the magnitude of benefit may be in the range of 15% only. Based on these and other studies, the recommendation is that treatment of H. pylori is beneficial in prevention of gastric cancer. The benefit is greater in patients without premalignant lesions. Hence treatment earlier in life may give better results. 1 Wong BCY, Lam SK, Wong WM et al: Helicobacter pylori eradication to prevent gastric cancer in a high-risk region in China: A randomized controlled trial. JAMA 291(2): 187-194, 2004. 2 Mera R, Fontham ET, Bravo LE et al: Long term follow up of patients treated for Helicobacter pylori infection. Gut 54: 1536, 2006.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/62349
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.895
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.815

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, BCYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-13T03:59:21Z-
dc.date.available2010-07-13T03:59:21Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citation8th International Conference of Anticancer Research, Kos, Greece, 17-22 October 2008. In Anticancer Research, 2008, v. 28 n. 5C, p. 3543 Abstract no. 731en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0250-7005-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/62349-
dc.description.abstractGastric cancer remains one of the top cancer killers in the World. Chronic Helicobacter pylori infection increases the risk of gastric cancer, by stepwise progression from chronic active gastritis to gastric atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia and finally cancer. These stepwise progressions may take many years, and at present there is no proven effective treatment for the presence of premalignant lesions including intestinal metaplasia or dysplasia. Hence the two prevailing questions in gastric cancer prevention are (a) whether treatment of H. pylori-related gastritis can reduce the risk of gastric cancer, and (b) whether treatment of H. pylori-related IM or dysplasia can both reverse the premalignant lesions and reduce the risk of gastric cancer. Our randomized placebo controlled trial in China started in year 1994 included both patients with H. pylori related gastritis and patients with H. pylori related premalignant lesions (1). After 7.5 years of follow up, patients receiving H. pylori treatment showed a non-significant trend of having less gastric cancer than those patients that received placebo. The sub-group analysis showed that patients with H. pylori related gastritis benefited most from treatment, with no cancer developing in 7.5 years. However, in patients with H. pylori related premalignant lesions, there was no difference in the risk of gastric cancer in both treatment and placebo groups. Hence our study suggests that the benefit of treating H. pylori in cancer prevention may be restricted to patients with gastritis only. Correa et al. performed another randomized placebo controlled trial in Columbia which included mainly patients with H. pylori- related premalignant lesions (2). Their 12- year follow up result suggested that subjects who were H. pylori negative after treatment had 14.8% more regression and 13.7% less progression than patients who were positive at 12 years (p=0.001). Hence he concludes that it is beneficial to treat H. pylori in patients with premalignant lesions. However the magnitude of benefit may be in the range of 15% only. Based on these and other studies, the recommendation is that treatment of H. pylori is beneficial in prevention of gastric cancer. The benefit is greater in patients without premalignant lesions. Hence treatment earlier in life may give better results. 1 Wong BCY, Lam SK, Wong WM et al: Helicobacter pylori eradication to prevent gastric cancer in a high-risk region in China: A randomized controlled trial. JAMA 291(2): 187-194, 2004. 2 Mera R, Fontham ET, Bravo LE et al: Long term follow up of patients treated for Helicobacter pylori infection. Gut 54: 1536, 2006.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherInternational Institute of Anticancer Research-
dc.relation.ispartofAnticancer Research-
dc.titleHelicobacter pylori eradication in the prevention of gastric canceren_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, BCY: bcywong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, BCY=rp00429en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros159032en_HK

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