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Conference Paper: Online dissemination of national influenza surveillance data

TitleOnline dissemination of national influenza surveillance data
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherInternationall Society for Disease Surveillance.
Citation
2008 ISDS Conference: Sustaining Innovation in Practice, Raleigh, NC, 3-5 December 2008. In Advances in Disease Surveillance, 2008, v. 5, p. 97 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVE This paper describes a review of modes and styles of the online dissemination of national influenza surveillance data. BACKGROUND Infectious disease surveillance is important for disease control as well as to inform prevention and treatment [1]. While influenza surveillance data coverage and quality has improved significantly in recent years due to resource investments and advances in information technology, the need remains for improvements in data dissemination to the wider community. METHODS We searched online for national influenza surveillance websites for every country (220 in total) and reviewed the resulting sites where available. Literature about influenza surveillance was searched at MEDLINE for relevant links to related websites. Non-English websites were translated into English using human translators or Google language tools. RESULTS A total of 90 national influenza surveillance websites were retained for investigation. 81/90 (90%) of the websites were found in developed countries. 82/90 (91%) websites were in English. Laboratory surveillance data were included in 35/90 (39%) websites. The most common surveillance methods included influenza-like illness consultation rates in primary care settings (54/90, 60%), institutional outbreaks (17/90, 19%) and mortality due to pneumonia and influenza (16/90, 18%). Almost all websites (87/90, 97%) provided weekly or monthly influenza activity reports. Only 3/90 (3%) websites provided dynamic data retrieval functions for end users. Data interpretation and activity forecasting of these websites were often empirical. DISCUSSION Appropriate surveillance data dissemination is important to maximize the utility of collected data. Online surveillance data presented in an interactive graphical interface may give timelier and clearer illustration of overall diseases activity than static periodical reports. Different audiences may prefer data to be presented in different ways, while raw data should be able to export in standard data file formats for further data processing. Incorporation of statistical algorithms to predict future disease activity may also increase the usefulness of surveillance data. REFERENCES [1] Stohr K. The global agenda on influenza surveillance and control. Vaccine, 2003: 21(16)1744-8.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/61837

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheng, KYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLau, EHYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, LMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCowling, BJen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-13T03:48:18Z-
dc.date.available2010-07-13T03:48:18Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citation2008 ISDS Conference: Sustaining Innovation in Practice, Raleigh, NC, 3-5 December 2008. In Advances in Disease Surveillance, 2008, v. 5, p. 97-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/61837-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE This paper describes a review of modes and styles of the online dissemination of national influenza surveillance data. BACKGROUND Infectious disease surveillance is important for disease control as well as to inform prevention and treatment [1]. While influenza surveillance data coverage and quality has improved significantly in recent years due to resource investments and advances in information technology, the need remains for improvements in data dissemination to the wider community. METHODS We searched online for national influenza surveillance websites for every country (220 in total) and reviewed the resulting sites where available. Literature about influenza surveillance was searched at MEDLINE for relevant links to related websites. Non-English websites were translated into English using human translators or Google language tools. RESULTS A total of 90 national influenza surveillance websites were retained for investigation. 81/90 (90%) of the websites were found in developed countries. 82/90 (91%) websites were in English. Laboratory surveillance data were included in 35/90 (39%) websites. The most common surveillance methods included influenza-like illness consultation rates in primary care settings (54/90, 60%), institutional outbreaks (17/90, 19%) and mortality due to pneumonia and influenza (16/90, 18%). Almost all websites (87/90, 97%) provided weekly or monthly influenza activity reports. Only 3/90 (3%) websites provided dynamic data retrieval functions for end users. Data interpretation and activity forecasting of these websites were often empirical. DISCUSSION Appropriate surveillance data dissemination is important to maximize the utility of collected data. Online surveillance data presented in an interactive graphical interface may give timelier and clearer illustration of overall diseases activity than static periodical reports. Different audiences may prefer data to be presented in different ways, while raw data should be able to export in standard data file formats for further data processing. Incorporation of statistical algorithms to predict future disease activity may also increase the usefulness of surveillance data. REFERENCES [1] Stohr K. The global agenda on influenza surveillance and control. Vaccine, 2003: 21(16)1744-8.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherInternationall Society for Disease Surveillance.en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAdvances in Disease Surveillance-
dc.titleOnline dissemination of national influenza surveillance dataen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLau, EHY: ehylau@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, LM: lmho@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailCowling, BJ: bcowling@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, LM=rp00360en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros154082en_HK

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