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Conference Paper: Regret mediates the relationship between decisional conflict and psychological distress among women choosing breast cancer surgery

TitleRegret mediates the relationship between decisional conflict and psychological distress among women choosing breast cancer surgery
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807
Citation
The IPOS 11th World Congress of Psycho-Oncology, Vienna, Austria, 21–25 June 2009. In Psycho-Oncology, 2009, v. 18 n. S2, p. s70 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: This study examined the med-iating effect of decision regret on the relationshipbetween decisional conflict and psychological dis-tress among women choosing breast cancer sur-gery. METHOD: A prospective study examinedtreatment decision making and psychological dis-tress in a convenience sample of Chinese womenrecently diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer(BC). Totally 195 (93% response rate) women withBC recruited from a major Hong Kong breastcentre were assessed at 3 days after the initialdiagnostic consultation (Baseline) and at 1-monthfollowing BC surgery (Follow-up). DecisionalConflict was assessed at Baseline, whereas DecisionRegret, Psychological Distress, Physical SymptomDistress, and Optimism were assessed at Follow-up. Forced-entry multiple regression analysestested the mediating effect of decision regret onthe relationship between decisional conflict anddistress. RESULTS: The average age of the womenwas 53 years old. Half of the women hadmastectomy and 31% had breast conserving surgery.Higher decisional conflict (b 5 .20, p 5 .008)resulted in higher regret (F(1,184) 5 7.24, p 5 .008).Higher decisional conflict (b 5 .142, p 5 .014) alsoresulted in greater distress at 1-month post-surgery(F(3,142) 5 37.05, po.001). After adjusting for the effects of physical symptom distress, age, andoptimism, decisional conflict (b 5 .120, p 5 .037)and regret (b 5 .151, p 5 .008), explained 45% ofthe variance in distress (F(5,179) 5 31.01, po.001).The Sobel test indicated that regret was a mediatorof the effect of decisional conflict on distress(z 5 2,74, p 5 .003 ). CONCLUSIONS: The effectof decisional conflict in choosing BC surgery onsubseque nt psychological distress was partiallymediated by decision regret. RESEARCH IMPLI-CATIONS: Future studies need to investigateconsul tation and other factors, contributing todecision conflict and regret. CLINICAL IMPLICA-TIONS: Optimizing TDM support aiming to reducedecision uncertainty and regret is potentially im-portant preventive strategy to minimize psychologi-cal distress following breast cancer. ACKNOWL-EDGEMENT OF FUNDING: None.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/61755
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.256
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.904

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLam, WWT-
dc.contributor.authorFielding, R-
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-13T03:46:37Z-
dc.date.available2010-07-13T03:46:37Z-
dc.date.issued2009-
dc.identifier.citationThe IPOS 11th World Congress of Psycho-Oncology, Vienna, Austria, 21–25 June 2009. In Psycho-Oncology, 2009, v. 18 n. S2, p. s70-
dc.identifier.issn1057-9249-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/61755-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: This study examined the med-iating effect of decision regret on the relationshipbetween decisional conflict and psychological dis-tress among women choosing breast cancer sur-gery. METHOD: A prospective study examinedtreatment decision making and psychological dis-tress in a convenience sample of Chinese womenrecently diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer(BC). Totally 195 (93% response rate) women withBC recruited from a major Hong Kong breastcentre were assessed at 3 days after the initialdiagnostic consultation (Baseline) and at 1-monthfollowing BC surgery (Follow-up). DecisionalConflict was assessed at Baseline, whereas DecisionRegret, Psychological Distress, Physical SymptomDistress, and Optimism were assessed at Follow-up. Forced-entry multiple regression analysestested the mediating effect of decision regret onthe relationship between decisional conflict anddistress. RESULTS: The average age of the womenwas 53 years old. Half of the women hadmastectomy and 31% had breast conserving surgery.Higher decisional conflict (b 5 .20, p 5 .008)resulted in higher regret (F(1,184) 5 7.24, p 5 .008).Higher decisional conflict (b 5 .142, p 5 .014) alsoresulted in greater distress at 1-month post-surgery(F(3,142) 5 37.05, po.001). After adjusting for the effects of physical symptom distress, age, andoptimism, decisional conflict (b 5 .120, p 5 .037)and regret (b 5 .151, p 5 .008), explained 45% ofthe variance in distress (F(5,179) 5 31.01, po.001).The Sobel test indicated that regret was a mediatorof the effect of decisional conflict on distress(z 5 2,74, p 5 .003 ). CONCLUSIONS: The effectof decisional conflict in choosing BC surgery onsubseque nt psychological distress was partiallymediated by decision regret. RESEARCH IMPLI-CATIONS: Future studies need to investigateconsul tation and other factors, contributing todecision conflict and regret. CLINICAL IMPLICA-TIONS: Optimizing TDM support aiming to reducedecision uncertainty and regret is potentially im-portant preventive strategy to minimize psychologi-cal distress following breast cancer. ACKNOWL-EDGEMENT OF FUNDING: None.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807-
dc.relation.ispartofPsycho-Oncology-
dc.rightsPsycho-Oncology. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons Ltd.-
dc.rightsSpecial Statement for Preprint only Before publication: 'This is a preprint of an article accepted for publication in [The Journal of Pathology] Copyright © ([year]) ([Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland])'. After publication: the preprint notice should be amended to follows: 'This is a preprint of an article published in [include the complete citation information for the final version of the Contribution as published in the print edition of the Journal]' For Cochrane Library/ Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, add statement & acknowledgement : ‘This review is published as a Cochrane Review in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 20XX, Issue X. Cochrane Reviews are regularly updated as new evidence emerges and in response to comments and criticisms, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews should be consulted for the most recent version of the Review.’ Please include reference to the Review and hyperlink to the original version using the following format e.g. Authors. Title of Review. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 20XX, Issue #. Art. No.: CD00XXXX. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD00XXXX (insert persistent link to the article by using the URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD00XXXX) (This statement should refer to the most recent issue of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews in which the Review published.)-
dc.titleRegret mediates the relationship between decisional conflict and psychological distress among women choosing breast cancer surgery-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailLam, WWT: wwtlam@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailFielding, R: fielding@hkusua.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, WWT=rp00443-
dc.identifier.authorityFielding, R=rp00339-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/pon.1594-
dc.identifier.hkuros162111-
dc.identifier.volume18-
dc.identifier.issueS2-
dc.identifier.spages70-
dc.identifier.epages70-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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