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Conference Paper: Brain cell culture is an effective learning activity for high school students to acquire diverse knowledge and skills about neuroscience

TitleBrain cell culture is an effective learning activity for high school students to acquire diverse knowledge and skills about neuroscience
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherSociety for Neuroscience
Citation
Neuroscience 2008, Washington, DC, 15-19 November 2008, Program#/Poster#: 222.17/UU5 How to Cite?
AbstractCell culture is a common tool in scientific research. By manipulating different culture conditions, scientists can study the morphological, biochemical and physiological changes of cells in response to variables. Due to the lack of cell culture facilities, teacher’s training in handling cell culture experiments and suitable source of cells, brain cell culture is rarely introduced in high school neuroscience lessons. To our knowledge, we are the only high school in Hong Kong to employ brain cell culture in our school-based neuroscience curriculum which was established in the academic year of 2004-2005. The objective of the present report is to share our 4-year experience in employing brain cell culture in high school neuroscience lessons. First, what is the background of our neuroscience curriculum? Two main parts of the curriculum contents are (a) the basic components of the human nervous system and (b) how the nervous system works and when it does not work. Most of the contents will be delivered through the experiment- or problem-based learning mode within 2 years. All participating students will conduct a group or individual research project which lasts for a year. Our laboratory is equipped with a class II laminar culture hood and one inverted microscope connected with a digital video system. Second, how can brain cell culture help students construct knowledge? All participating students have opportunities to culture brain cells. Through cell culture, students acquire knowledge about neuronal structure and growth. By manipulating different stressful conditions to the cultured cells, students can understand the process of neuronal death which occurs in many neurodegenerative diseases. Students will also develop a variety of research skills when solving problems about brain cell culture. Third, is brain cell culture an effective learning activity to students? In terms of interest, all interviewed students replied that they liked culturing brain cells. Besides, teacher’s observation indicates that active learning about the knowledge and skills associated with brain cell culture occurs among the participating students. Frequent discussion about brain cells is also observed. We conclude that brain cell culture is an effective learning activity for high school students to acquire diverse knowledge and skills about neuroscience.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/61388

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSuen, KCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, WKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChang, RCCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-13T03:38:40Z-
dc.date.available2010-07-13T03:38:40Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationNeuroscience 2008, Washington, DC, 15-19 November 2008, Program#/Poster#: 222.17/UU5en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/61388-
dc.description.abstractCell culture is a common tool in scientific research. By manipulating different culture conditions, scientists can study the morphological, biochemical and physiological changes of cells in response to variables. Due to the lack of cell culture facilities, teacher’s training in handling cell culture experiments and suitable source of cells, brain cell culture is rarely introduced in high school neuroscience lessons. To our knowledge, we are the only high school in Hong Kong to employ brain cell culture in our school-based neuroscience curriculum which was established in the academic year of 2004-2005. The objective of the present report is to share our 4-year experience in employing brain cell culture in high school neuroscience lessons. First, what is the background of our neuroscience curriculum? Two main parts of the curriculum contents are (a) the basic components of the human nervous system and (b) how the nervous system works and when it does not work. Most of the contents will be delivered through the experiment- or problem-based learning mode within 2 years. All participating students will conduct a group or individual research project which lasts for a year. Our laboratory is equipped with a class II laminar culture hood and one inverted microscope connected with a digital video system. Second, how can brain cell culture help students construct knowledge? All participating students have opportunities to culture brain cells. Through cell culture, students acquire knowledge about neuronal structure and growth. By manipulating different stressful conditions to the cultured cells, students can understand the process of neuronal death which occurs in many neurodegenerative diseases. Students will also develop a variety of research skills when solving problems about brain cell culture. Third, is brain cell culture an effective learning activity to students? In terms of interest, all interviewed students replied that they liked culturing brain cells. Besides, teacher’s observation indicates that active learning about the knowledge and skills associated with brain cell culture occurs among the participating students. Frequent discussion about brain cells is also observed. We conclude that brain cell culture is an effective learning activity for high school students to acquire diverse knowledge and skills about neuroscience.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSociety for Neuroscience-
dc.relation.ispartofSociety for Neuroscience Annual Meeting-
dc.titleBrain cell culture is an effective learning activity for high school students to acquire diverse knowledge and skills about neuroscienceen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChang, RCC: rccchang@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChang, RCC=rp00470en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros154573en_HK

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