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Conference Paper: Bilateral sagittal split osteotomies versus mandibular distraction osteogenesis: which is better?

TitleBilateral sagittal split osteotomies versus mandibular distraction osteogenesis: which is better?
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherChurchill Livingstone. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ijom
Citation
The 19th International Conference on Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Shanghai, China, 23-27 May 2009 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground and Objectives: Bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO) and mandibular distraction ostoegenesis (MDO) have both been applied in the surgical treatment of Class II mandibular hypoplasia. For advancements between 6-10 mm, there has yet to be any comparison of which method is more stable. BSSO have also been associated with a high incidence of neurosensory disturbance of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN). This randomised controlled trial aims to compare the stability and morbidities of both techniques for mandibular advancements between 6-10 mm. Methods: 14 Class II mandibular hypoplasia patients requiring mandibular advancement of 6–10 mm were randomised into 2 groups for either BSSO or MDO. Serial lateral cephalographs were taken at postoperative periods 2 weeks (TBD1), 6 weeks (TBD2), 12 weeks (TBD3), 6 months (TBD4) and 12 months (TBD5). Skeletal stability using specific cephalometric landmarks was assessed at the respective postoperative periods. Objective neurosensory evaluation was performed and any postoperative complications recorded. The paired t test was used to analyse stability and neurosensory scores with statistical significance set at P < 0.05. Results: There was no significant difference (P > 0.05) in horizontal skeletal stability between the two groups from TBD1-TBD5. Objective neurosensory evaluation showed no significant differences (P > 0.05) in objective scores from TBD1-TBD3 between the 2 groups. Postoperative complications included posterior open bite (BSSO = 1; MDO = 1), wound infection (BSSO = 2; MDO = 4) and condylar resorption (BSSO = 1; MDO = 1). Conclusions: Skeletal stability and postoperative complications seem to be comparable between BSSO and MDO for advancements between 6–10 mm. Both groups reported elevated objective neurosensory scores in the early-postoperative period. A greater sample size is required to ascertain which technique is better.
DescriptionInternational Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, 2009, v. 38 n. 5, p. 564, Poster Presentation, abstract no. P113
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/61366
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.563
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.854

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorOw, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, LKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-13T03:38:05Z-
dc.date.available2010-07-13T03:38:05Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe 19th International Conference on Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Shanghai, China, 23-27 May 2009en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0901-5027en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/61366-
dc.descriptionInternational Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, 2009, v. 38 n. 5, p. 564, Poster Presentation, abstract no. P113-
dc.description.abstractBackground and Objectives: Bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO) and mandibular distraction ostoegenesis (MDO) have both been applied in the surgical treatment of Class II mandibular hypoplasia. For advancements between 6-10 mm, there has yet to be any comparison of which method is more stable. BSSO have also been associated with a high incidence of neurosensory disturbance of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN). This randomised controlled trial aims to compare the stability and morbidities of both techniques for mandibular advancements between 6-10 mm. Methods: 14 Class II mandibular hypoplasia patients requiring mandibular advancement of 6–10 mm were randomised into 2 groups for either BSSO or MDO. Serial lateral cephalographs were taken at postoperative periods 2 weeks (TBD1), 6 weeks (TBD2), 12 weeks (TBD3), 6 months (TBD4) and 12 months (TBD5). Skeletal stability using specific cephalometric landmarks was assessed at the respective postoperative periods. Objective neurosensory evaluation was performed and any postoperative complications recorded. The paired t test was used to analyse stability and neurosensory scores with statistical significance set at P < 0.05. Results: There was no significant difference (P > 0.05) in horizontal skeletal stability between the two groups from TBD1-TBD5. Objective neurosensory evaluation showed no significant differences (P > 0.05) in objective scores from TBD1-TBD3 between the 2 groups. Postoperative complications included posterior open bite (BSSO = 1; MDO = 1), wound infection (BSSO = 2; MDO = 4) and condylar resorption (BSSO = 1; MDO = 1). Conclusions: Skeletal stability and postoperative complications seem to be comparable between BSSO and MDO for advancements between 6–10 mm. Both groups reported elevated objective neurosensory scores in the early-postoperative period. A greater sample size is required to ascertain which technique is better.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherChurchill Livingstone. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ijomen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Conference on Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery-
dc.titleBilateral sagittal split osteotomies versus mandibular distraction osteogenesis: which is better?en_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0901-5027&volume=38 &issue=5&spage=p 564 (P113)&epage=&date=2009&atitle=Bilateral+sagittal+split+osteotomies+versus+mandibular+distraction+osteogenesis:+which+is+better?en_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheung, LK: lkcheung@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, LK=rp00013en_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijom.2009.03.586-
dc.identifier.hkuros156081en_HK

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