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Article: Measuring Trust in Government: A Hong Kong Perspective

TitleMeasuring Trust in Government: A Hong Kong Perspective
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherThe International Public Management Network. The Journal's web site is located at http://www1.imp.unisg.ch/org/idt/ipmr.nsf/
Citation
International Public Management Review, 2008, v. 9 n. 2, p. 107-126 How to Cite?
AbstractTrust and legitimacy occupy a central position in contemporary discourse surrounding the process of environmental reform in late-modern societies. This study examines dimensions of trust from stakeholders and uses a group process to enrich the data describing and explaining the reasons behind a possible ‘trust deficit’ in the context of environmental governance and policy making in Hong Kong. Results from focus groups indicate that trust in government with regard to environmental issues is generally very low. Factors include poor leadership, a rather out-dated mindset of the government, inflexible government structures, inconsistent governance, misplaced knowledge and expertise in the government and its reluctance to create dialogue or communication. Stakeholders suggested that to enhance public trust in the government, the government needed to develop stronger leadership, reform government structure, improve communication on environmental issues to the public, take input from the community more seriously and make better use of regulation and provide incentives for environmental protection.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60930
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBurnett, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorTsang, SSLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorStuder, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHills, PRen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWelford, RJen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T04:22:09Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T04:22:09Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Public Management Review, 2008, v. 9 n. 2, p. 107-126en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1662-1387en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60930-
dc.description.abstractTrust and legitimacy occupy a central position in contemporary discourse surrounding the process of environmental reform in late-modern societies. This study examines dimensions of trust from stakeholders and uses a group process to enrich the data describing and explaining the reasons behind a possible ‘trust deficit’ in the context of environmental governance and policy making in Hong Kong. Results from focus groups indicate that trust in government with regard to environmental issues is generally very low. Factors include poor leadership, a rather out-dated mindset of the government, inflexible government structures, inconsistent governance, misplaced knowledge and expertise in the government and its reluctance to create dialogue or communication. Stakeholders suggested that to enhance public trust in the government, the government needed to develop stronger leadership, reform government structure, improve communication on environmental issues to the public, take input from the community more seriously and make better use of regulation and provide incentives for environmental protection.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherThe International Public Management Network. The Journal's web site is located at http://www1.imp.unisg.ch/org/idt/ipmr.nsf/-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Public Management Reviewen_HK
dc.titleMeasuring Trust in Government: A Hong Kong Perspectiveen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailTsang, SSL: a9604431@graduate.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHills, PR: phills@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWelford, RJ: rwelford@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityHills, PR=rp00858en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWelford, RJ=rp00879en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros165365en_HK
dc.identifier.volume9-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage107-
dc.identifier.epage126-
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerland-

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