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Article: When high achievers and low achievers work in the same group: The roles of group heterogeneity and processes in project-based learning

TitleWhen high achievers and low achievers work in the same group: The roles of group heterogeneity and processes in project-based learning
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherThe British Psychological Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bps.org.uk/publications/jEP_1.cfm
Citation
British Journal Of Educational Psychology, 2008, v. 78 n. 2, p. 205-221 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground. There has been an ongoing debate about the inconsistent effects of heterogeneous ability grouping on students in small group work such as project-based learning. Aim. The present research investigated the roles of group heterogeneity and processes in project-based learning. At the student level, we examined the interaction effect between students' within-group achievement and group processes on their self-and collective efficacy. At the group level, we examined how group heterogeneity was associated with the average self- and collective efficacy reported by the groups. Sample. The participants were 1,921 Hong Kong secondary students in 367 project-based learning groups. Method. Student achievement was determined by school examination marks. Group processes, self-efficacy and collective efficacy were measured by a student-report questionnaire. Hierarchical linear modelling was used to analyse the nested data. Results. When individual students in each group were taken as the unit of analysis, results indicated an interaction effect of group processes and students' within-group achievement on the discrepancy between collective- and self-efficacy. When compared with low achievers, high achievers reported lower collective efficacy than self-efficacy when group processes were of low quality. However, both low and high achievers reported higher collective efficacy than self-efficacy when group processes were of high quality. With 367 groups taken as the unit of analysis, the results showed that group heterogeneity, group gender composition and group size were not related to the discrepancy between collective- and self-efficacy reported by the students. Conclusions. Group heterogeneity was not a determinant factor in students' learning efficacy. Instead, the quality of group processes played a pivotal role because both high and low achievers were able to benefit when group processes were of high quality. © 2008 The British Psychological Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60764
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.0
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.304
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheng, RWYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, SFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, JCYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T04:18:00Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T04:18:00Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal Of Educational Psychology, 2008, v. 78 n. 2, p. 205-221en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0007-0998en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60764-
dc.description.abstractBackground. There has been an ongoing debate about the inconsistent effects of heterogeneous ability grouping on students in small group work such as project-based learning. Aim. The present research investigated the roles of group heterogeneity and processes in project-based learning. At the student level, we examined the interaction effect between students' within-group achievement and group processes on their self-and collective efficacy. At the group level, we examined how group heterogeneity was associated with the average self- and collective efficacy reported by the groups. Sample. The participants were 1,921 Hong Kong secondary students in 367 project-based learning groups. Method. Student achievement was determined by school examination marks. Group processes, self-efficacy and collective efficacy were measured by a student-report questionnaire. Hierarchical linear modelling was used to analyse the nested data. Results. When individual students in each group were taken as the unit of analysis, results indicated an interaction effect of group processes and students' within-group achievement on the discrepancy between collective- and self-efficacy. When compared with low achievers, high achievers reported lower collective efficacy than self-efficacy when group processes were of low quality. However, both low and high achievers reported higher collective efficacy than self-efficacy when group processes were of high quality. With 367 groups taken as the unit of analysis, the results showed that group heterogeneity, group gender composition and group size were not related to the discrepancy between collective- and self-efficacy reported by the students. Conclusions. Group heterogeneity was not a determinant factor in students' learning efficacy. Instead, the quality of group processes played a pivotal role because both high and low achievers were able to benefit when group processes were of high quality. © 2008 The British Psychological Society.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherThe British Psychological Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bps.org.uk/publications/jEP_1.cfmen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBritish Journal of Educational Psychologyen_HK
dc.titleWhen high achievers and low achievers work in the same group: The roles of group heterogeneity and processes in project-based learningen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0007-0998&volume=78&spage=205&epage=221&date=2008&atitle=When+high+achievers+and+low+achievers+work+in+the+same+group:+The+roles+of+group+heterogeneity+and+processes+in+project-based+learning.en_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, SF:lamsf@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, SF=rp00568en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1348/000709907X218160en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17588293-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-46249101253en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros162615en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-46249101253&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume78en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage205en_HK
dc.identifier.epage221en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000257235200002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, RWY=16041291000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, SF=7402279467en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, JCY=16206300300en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike2852087-

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