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Article: Theta and alpha oscillations linked to risk identifications

TitleTheta and alpha oscillations linked to risk identifications
Authors
KeywordsAlpha
EEG
Risk
Theta
Wavelet analysis
Issue Date2009
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/brainres
Citation
Brain Research, 2009, v. 1269, p. 125-134 How to Cite?
AbstractOur recent functional MRI and event-related potential studies suggest that neural mechanisms underlying identifications of environmental and personal risks are characterized by distinct neural structures and time courses. The current work further investigated the role of non-phase locked activity in dissociation of the neural processes of environmental and personal risks. We recorded electroencephalogram (EEG) from healthy adults when they identified risky and safe environmental or personal events depicted in words or phrases. Event-related synchronization (ERS) and desynchronization (ERD) in association with risky and safe environmental and personal events were calculated using Morlet's wavelet analysis. We found that, relative to the identification of safe environmental events, the identification of risky environmental events induced increased theta band power at 260-380 ms over the frontal cortex and increased alpha band power after 700 ms with a wide scalp distribution. Moreover, theta band powers associated with the identification of risky environmental events correlated positively with subjective ratings of the risk degree of environmental events. In contrast, the identification of risky personal events was linked to decreased alpha band power at 740-900 ms with a wide scalp distribution compared with the identification of safe personal events. Our findings indicate that theta and alpha band neural oscillations are involved in differentiation between environmental and personal risks. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60758
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.561
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.351
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
National Natural Science Foundation of China3063002S
30828012
Funding Information:

This research was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Project 3063002S, 30828012).

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorQin, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, TMCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHan, Sen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T04:17:53Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T04:17:53Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBrain Research, 2009, v. 1269, p. 125-134en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0006-8993en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60758-
dc.description.abstractOur recent functional MRI and event-related potential studies suggest that neural mechanisms underlying identifications of environmental and personal risks are characterized by distinct neural structures and time courses. The current work further investigated the role of non-phase locked activity in dissociation of the neural processes of environmental and personal risks. We recorded electroencephalogram (EEG) from healthy adults when they identified risky and safe environmental or personal events depicted in words or phrases. Event-related synchronization (ERS) and desynchronization (ERD) in association with risky and safe environmental and personal events were calculated using Morlet's wavelet analysis. We found that, relative to the identification of safe environmental events, the identification of risky environmental events induced increased theta band power at 260-380 ms over the frontal cortex and increased alpha band power after 700 ms with a wide scalp distribution. Moreover, theta band powers associated with the identification of risky environmental events correlated positively with subjective ratings of the risk degree of environmental events. In contrast, the identification of risky personal events was linked to decreased alpha band power at 740-900 ms with a wide scalp distribution compared with the identification of safe personal events. Our findings indicate that theta and alpha band neural oscillations are involved in differentiation between environmental and personal risks. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/brainresen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBrain Researchen_HK
dc.rightsBrain Research. Copyright © Elsevier BV.en_HK
dc.subjectAlphaen_HK
dc.subjectEEGen_HK
dc.subjectRisken_HK
dc.subjectThetaen_HK
dc.subjectWavelet analysisen_HK
dc.titleTheta and alpha oscillations linked to risk identificationsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0006-8993&volume=1269&spage=125&epage=134&date=2009&atitle=Theta+and+alpha+oscillations+linked+to+risk+identificationsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLee, TMC:tmclee@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLee, TMC=rp00564en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.brainres.2009.02.077en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19285971-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-67349116770en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros158102en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-67349116770&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume1269en_HK
dc.identifier.spage125en_HK
dc.identifier.epage134en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000266294900013-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridQin, J=9234332700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, TMC=7501437381en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHan, S=7405942378en_HK

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