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Article: Are errors differentiable from deceptive responses when feigning memory impairment? An fMRI study

TitleAre errors differentiable from deceptive responses when feigning memory impairment? An fMRI study
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/b&c
Citation
Brain And Cognition, 2009, v. 69 n. 2, p. 406-412 How to Cite?
AbstractPrevious neuroimaging studies have suggested that the neural activity associated with truthful recall, with false memory, and with feigned memory impairment are different from one another. Here, we report a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study that addressed an important but yet unanswered question: Is the neural activity associated with intentional faked responses and with errors differentiable? Using a word list learning recognition paradigm, the findings of this mixed event-related fMRI study clearly indicated that the brain activity associated with intentional faked responses was different to the activity associated with errors committed unintentionally. For intentional faked responses, significant activation was found in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, the posterior cingulate region, and the precuneus. However, no significant activation was observed for unintentional errors. The results suggest that deception, in terms of feigning memory impairment, is not only more cognitively demanding than making unintentional errors but also utilizes different cognitive processes. © 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60755
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.399
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.511
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, TMCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAu, RKCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLiu, HLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTing, KHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHuang, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, CCHen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T04:17:50Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T04:17:50Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBrain And Cognition, 2009, v. 69 n. 2, p. 406-412en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0278-2626en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60755-
dc.description.abstractPrevious neuroimaging studies have suggested that the neural activity associated with truthful recall, with false memory, and with feigned memory impairment are different from one another. Here, we report a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study that addressed an important but yet unanswered question: Is the neural activity associated with intentional faked responses and with errors differentiable? Using a word list learning recognition paradigm, the findings of this mixed event-related fMRI study clearly indicated that the brain activity associated with intentional faked responses was different to the activity associated with errors committed unintentionally. For intentional faked responses, significant activation was found in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, the posterior cingulate region, and the precuneus. However, no significant activation was observed for unintentional errors. The results suggest that deception, in terms of feigning memory impairment, is not only more cognitively demanding than making unintentional errors but also utilizes different cognitive processes. © 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/b&cen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBrain and Cognitionen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshAnalysis of Varianceen_HK
dc.subject.meshBrain - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshBrain Mappingen_HK
dc.subject.meshDeceptionen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imagingen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMemory Disorders - physiopathologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshReaction Timeen_HK
dc.subject.meshRecognition (Psychology) - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshSemanticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_HK
dc.titleAre errors differentiable from deceptive responses when feigning memory impairment? An fMRI studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0278-2626&volume=69&spage=406&epage=412&date=2009&atitle=Are+errors+differentiable+from+deceptive+responses+when+feigning+memory+impairment?+An+fMRI+studyen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLee, TMC:tmclee@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLee, TMC=rp00564en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.bandc.2008.09.002en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18938008en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-59349109590en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros154449en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-59349109590&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume69en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage406en_HK
dc.identifier.epage412en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000263581900021-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, TMC=7501437381en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAu, RKC=25228211000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, HL=7409756284en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTing, KH=52264694300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHuang, CM=24334976500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, CCH=16244174500en_HK

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