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Article: Perception of tone and aspiration contrasts in Chinese children with dyslexia

TitlePerception of tone and aspiration contrasts in Chinese children with dyslexia
Authors
KeywordsAspiration
Categorical perception
Chinese
Disorder
Dyslexia
Reading
Tone
Issue Date2009
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/JCPP
Citation
Journal Of Child Psychology And Psychiatry And Allied Disciplines, 2009, v. 50 n. 6, p. 726-733 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Previous research has shown a relationship between speech perception and dyslexia in alphabetic writing. In these studies speech perception was measured using phonemes, a prominent feature of alphabetic languages. Given the primary importance of lexical tone in Chinese language processing, we tested the extent to which lexical tone and aspiration, two fundamental dimensions of Cantonese speech not represented in writing, would distinguish dyslexic from non-dyslexic 8-year-old Chinese children. Tone and aspiration were tested in addition to other phonological processing skills across groups to determine the importance of different aspects of phonological sensitivity in relation to reading disability. Methods: Dyslexic children and age-matched and reading-level controls were tested on their categorical perception of minimal pairs contrasting in tone and aspiration, phonological awareness, rapid digit naming, and Chinese reading abilities. Results: While performing similarly to reading-level controls, dyslexic children perceived tone and aspiration contrasts less categorically and accurately than age-matched controls. They also performed more poorly than the age-matched controls on rapid digit naming and a measure of phonological awareness testing children's sensitivity to different grain size units. Conclusions: Dyslexia in non-alphabetic Chinese correlates with the categorical organization and accuracy of Cantonese speech perception, along the tone and aspiration dimensions. This association with reading is mediated by its association with phonological awareness. Therefore, dyslexia is universally at least partly a function of basic speech and phonological processes independent of whether the speech dimensions in question are coded in writing. © 2008 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60747
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 6.615
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.046
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University Grants Committee, Hong KongHKIED 8402/05H
Funding Information:

This research was supported by a Competitive Earmarked Research Grant to Kevin K.H. Chung from University Grants Committee (HKIED 8402/05H), Hong Kong. We thank the editor and two anonymous reviewers for their constructive comments on an earlier version of the paper.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChung, KKHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, SWLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMcBrideChang, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPenney, TBen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, CSHen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T04:17:42Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T04:17:42Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Child Psychology And Psychiatry And Allied Disciplines, 2009, v. 50 n. 6, p. 726-733en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0021-9630en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60747-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Previous research has shown a relationship between speech perception and dyslexia in alphabetic writing. In these studies speech perception was measured using phonemes, a prominent feature of alphabetic languages. Given the primary importance of lexical tone in Chinese language processing, we tested the extent to which lexical tone and aspiration, two fundamental dimensions of Cantonese speech not represented in writing, would distinguish dyslexic from non-dyslexic 8-year-old Chinese children. Tone and aspiration were tested in addition to other phonological processing skills across groups to determine the importance of different aspects of phonological sensitivity in relation to reading disability. Methods: Dyslexic children and age-matched and reading-level controls were tested on their categorical perception of minimal pairs contrasting in tone and aspiration, phonological awareness, rapid digit naming, and Chinese reading abilities. Results: While performing similarly to reading-level controls, dyslexic children perceived tone and aspiration contrasts less categorically and accurately than age-matched controls. They also performed more poorly than the age-matched controls on rapid digit naming and a measure of phonological awareness testing children's sensitivity to different grain size units. Conclusions: Dyslexia in non-alphabetic Chinese correlates with the categorical organization and accuracy of Cantonese speech perception, along the tone and aspiration dimensions. This association with reading is mediated by its association with phonological awareness. Therefore, dyslexia is universally at least partly a function of basic speech and phonological processes independent of whether the speech dimensions in question are coded in writing. © 2008 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/JCPPen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplinesen_HK
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www3.interscience.wiley.com-
dc.subjectAspirationen_HK
dc.subjectCategorical perceptionen_HK
dc.subjectChineseen_HK
dc.subjectDisorderen_HK
dc.subjectDyslexiaen_HK
dc.subjectReadingen_HK
dc.subjectToneen_HK
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Group-
dc.subject.meshDyslexia - diagnosis-
dc.subject.meshPhonetics-
dc.subject.meshPitch Perception-
dc.subject.meshSpeech Perception-
dc.titlePerception of tone and aspiration contrasts in Chinese children with dyslexiaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0021-9630&volume=50&issue=6&spage=726&epage=733&date=2009&atitle=Perception+of+tone+and+aspiration+contrasts+in+Chinese+children+with+dyslexia-
dc.identifier.emailHo, CSH:shhoc@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, CSH=rp00631en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1469-7610.2008.02001.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19175808-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-70349560654en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros160002en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-70349560654&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume50en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage726en_HK
dc.identifier.epage733en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000266027300009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, H=7201839383en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChung, KKH=13302613100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, SWL=35095800900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcBrideChang, C=7003801617en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPenney, TB=7004926138en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, CSH=35095289900en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike4624090-

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